Inspiring Quotes from 16 of Our Favorite Women Writers

With women writers ranging from those who have influenced our childhood to those who we have read in literature classes to gain a more insightful view on the world to the young adult novelists we still shamelessly adore, here are some inspiring quotes that talk about love, hardships, writing, courage and life. (And a little plus—many of them are the right dimensions for a lock screen!)

1. Alice Walker

The author of the critically acclaimed novel "The Color Purple," Walker is a social activist in the area of creating a better experience for women, particularly those of color.

2. bell hooks

hooks’s writing addresses intersectionality within race and gender. She uses a snappy voice to promote an end to sexism such as in "Ain't I a Woman?: Black Women and Feminism."

3. Beverly Cleary

Cleary wrote "Are You There God? It’s Me Margaret"—and played a major part in our childhood on how to grow up and become young women.

4. Harper Lee

Lee is the author of arguably the most influential American novel of our time, "To Kill a Mockingbird." She encourages bravery to do what’s right and to never apologize for it.

5. Jane Austen

Who doesn’t love poor Mr. Darcy in the classic "Pride and Prejudice?" Austen wrote some of our favorite characters in literature and lives on as one of our favorite classical authors outside of required English courses.

6. Jenny Han

Once of the best current young adult romance writers, Han is an advocate for finding yourself in the midst of love as shown in "The Summer I Turned Pretty" series and "To All the Boys I’ve Loved Before" series.

7. J.K. Rowling

Some of us would consider Rowling our favorite writer of our favorite series, "Harry Potter." She has defined our childhood, and we cannot thank her enough for the lessons about courage and sacrificial love she has taught us.

8. Lauren Myracle

The author of the "Eleven" series and the "ttyl" series, Lauren Myracle has led us through childhood, enlightening us on the things that make us human.

9. Louisa May Alcott

Alcott, as the author of popular novel "Little Women," speaks directly to our experience as young women growing up amongst trials and tribulations and love.

10. Margaret Atwood

Atwood is one tough cookie. The author of the (before-it-was-cool) dystopian novel, "The Handmaid’s Tale," she dives into what it means to be a woman and what it means to do what you’re told.

11. Marilynne Robinson

President Obama’s favorite writer and a recently retired professor at the University of Iowa, Robinson’s writing artfully and beautifully takes on the meaning of life—and comes to the conclusion that it is all meaningful.

12. Maya Angelou

With an incredibly successful career under her belt, Angelou is considered one of the most beautiful and influential poets of our time. She defends Black culture and has brought in her own experiences to make her writing that much more impactful.

13. Sarah Dessen

A woman who draws us in to her tragic love stories, Dessen has made a name for herself in the young adult sphere with books such as "The Truth About Forever" and "Along For the Ride," exploring loss and how love can be scary, but it's worth it.

14. Simone de Beauvoir

A French writer, known not only for her writing but her philosophy as well, de Beauvoir wrote "The Second Sex," one of the most influential texts for modern feminism.

15. Sylvia Plath

One of the most tortured writers in history, Plath wrote many short stories and works of poetry including the well-known "The Bell Jar." She tackled some of the most difficult topics in the human experience, the key being how no one is ever quite how they appear on the outside.

16. Toni Morrison

A critically-acclaimed and well-experienced writer of novels such as "Song of Solomon" and "Beloved," Morrison has written mostly on the experiences of black women and the strength it takes to be one.

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