Eating Healthy on Meal Plan

In a society obsessed with health and image, the “freshman 15” is an infamous phenomenon that haunts 18-year-old, incoming freshmen. The change of environment, kitchen availability and various other factors all can lead to a slight influx of weight. It is easy to rely on a quick, easy buffet in the school dining halls or the Panda Express expedited line for convenience between classes. The truth is, many freshman-year diets can take a toll on your physical and mental health. I personally chose to eat fast food for every meal. As a child who grew up with healthy, home-cooked meals, I was like a kid in a candy store with all the fast-food that meal plan had to offer. Here are some on-campus options that I wish I had known about while on the beloved Flex 5. 

 

Shake Smart is an SDSU-creation, started by two fraternity men who desired a healthy option on campus. This reasonably-priced chain has two locations on campus, one in the Student Union and the other outside of the recreation centre. There are fruit and protein-based smoothies, with gluten-free and vegan options for those with dietary restrictions. They offer small meals such as peanut butter banana sandwiches and overnight oats, a great breakfast option for on-the-go meal plan users. To add extra benefits to your Shake Smart order, consider using half agave (sweetener) and adding superfood powder for a small fee.

 

Eureka is a new addition to the meal plan that I wish I had as a freshman. The protein chopped salad is jam-packed with nutrients to fuel any freshman with all the energy necessary to ace RWS100. What makes this salad better than others on campus is the kale and quinoa, two expensive ingredients that can be hard to find elsewhere on campus. Besides the healthy options, the garlic truffle fries are to die for and honestly, I would bathe in the sauce if I could afford it.

 

For vegans, a huge victory was accomplished when SDSU decided to put a Plant Power franchise on campus, replacing the off-brand Denny’s that was only used when everything else closed and you realized you had $12 left on your meal plan. Although everything at this restaurant is vegan, that does not automatically make it healthy. I scoured the internet for nutrition facts from this place, and they are nowhere to be found, which is slightly concerning. So unless you are actually vegan, I would stick to the various salad options that Plant Power has to offer. 

 

While my freshman year Rubio’s order was nachos loaded with sour cream and cheese, this option will leave you feeling lethargic and stuffed. A few better options are the California bowl and tacos with grilled options instead of fried. You can also remove cheese or sour cream for a slightly less satisfying, but more nutritious experience.

 

Although East Commons can be a daunting place for a freshman worried about their health and image, as you migrate through the semester you will get into an eating routine that works for you. Eating healthy has such a strong effect on your mental and physical health so it’s up to you to make decisions that benefit your college experience. There’s nothing wrong with a baked potato from the garden every once in a while, but your body will thank you for alternating it with a salad every once in a while.

 

Shake Smart is an SDSU-creation, started by two fraternity men who desired a healthy option on campus. This reasonably-priced chain has two locations on campus, one in the Student Union and the other outside of the recreation centre. There are fruit and protein-based smoothies, with gluten-free and vegan options for those with dietary restrictions. They offer small meals such as peanut butter banana sandwiches and overnight oats, a great breakfast option for on-the-go meal plan users. To add extra benefits to your Shake Smart order, consider using half agave (sweetener) and adding superfood powder for a small fee.

 

Eureka is a new addition to the meal plan that I wish I had as a freshman. The protein chopped salad is jam-packed with nutrients to fuel any freshman with all the energy necessary to ace RWS100. What makes this salad better than others on campus is the kale and quinoa, two expensive ingredients that can be hard to find elsewhere on campus. Besides the healthy options, the garlic truffle fries are to die for and honestly, I would bathe in the sauce if I could afford it.

 

For vegans, a huge victory was accomplished when SDSU decided to put a Plant Power franchise on campus, replacing the off-brand Denny’s that was only used when everything else closed and you realized you had $12 left on your meal plan. Although everything at this restaurant is vegan, that does not automatically make it healthy. I scoured the internet for nutrition facts from this place, and they are nowhere to be found, which is slightly concerning. So unless you are actually vegan, I would stick to the various salad options that Plant Power has to offer. 

 

While my freshman year Rubio’s order was nachos loaded with sour cream and cheese, this option will leave you feeling lethargic and stuffed. A few better options are the California bowl and tacos with grilled options instead of fried. You can also remove cheese or sour cream for a slightly less satisfying, but more nutritious experience.

 

Although East Commons can be a daunting place for a freshman worried about their health and image, as you migrate through the semester you will get into an eating routine that works for you. Eating healthy has such a strong effect on your mental and physical health so it’s up to you to make decisions that benefit your college experience. There’s nothing wrong with a baked potato from the garden every once in a while, but your body will thank you for alternating it with a salad every once in a while.