Internship Tips For This Summer and Beyond    

      From playing phone tag with hiring managers to trying to find the best and most impressive ways to describe your last summer job, the internship search can be plenty stressful, time-consuming, and confusing. There’s no one right way to go about it, but I have learned some things since starting my own internship search.

Career Fairs

Go to the career fairs even if you aren’t sure what companies are going to be there. I know that a lot of times there’s not an equal representation of people’s interests and desired fields, but you might be surprised. If nothing else, career fairs are a great way to make connections with employers and alumni—if you tell them what you’re interested, who knows what opportunities they might know about?

If you do manage to find a field or company you’re interested in, getting to introduce yourself and talk to the employer in person is so much better than awkward email introductions. After the career fair, make sure to send them a follow-up email just saying that you enjoyed meeting with them, and if you haven’t yet, that you would like to intern with them if possible. Career fairs can be hectic and uncomfortable, so emailing someone afterward can be a good way to not only lock in a connection you made, but also to get in some of the questions that you forgot

 

Use Online Resources...

            First of all, TigerTracks is there specifically for our internship needs. If you haven’t been on before, go on and look through some of the internships. Again, the selection might not be quite as wide as we wish it were, but see what’s there. You would only be doing this job for a summer, or maybe a semester, so focus on what could give you valuable experience to put on your resume. And then apply for anything and everything that fits that category.

Using social media to find an internship can also give varying results, but it gives you the opportunity to show initiative. If you don’t have a LinkedIn, try it out. Search DePauw alumni and see if anyone works in a field or for a company that you’d be interested in—then, as uncomfortable as it is, message them on LinkedIn or Facebook and see if you can get a reply. Sometimes people don’t check their LinkedIn or, as many of us have experienced, they answer you for awhile and then fall of the face of the earth, but just see what happens. You might just find someone who’s really eager to take on an intern or help a fellow Tiger out.

…As Well As Personal Ones

Ask your family, ask your friends, ask your Facebook friends. Ask your adviser, especially since they might have experience or connections in your desired field. Make a visit to the Hubbard Center and see if they can help with your specific needs.

Don't Give Up!           

            Honestly, apply to everything you see. Something will work out. You’d much rather have to tell someone ‘no’ than not get any offers because you only applied for a few internships.

            If you’ve done all of this and can’t find anything or no one is answering you or accepting you, don’t panic. First of all, your life isn’t over, I promise. Secondly, make sure you’re involved on campus. If you can get a leadership position or join a club that might look good to employers in your field, that’ll be a big help to your resume on its own.

Happy hunting!