My Top 5 Latino Desserts: Fall Edition

If there is something I love about this time of year, it is the food my grandma will be cooking! My grandma and I have always had an amazing relationship. She makes sure to include all her grandkids when she cooks because she believes it is so important to continue family recipes through generations. I love walking into her home because of all the amazing scents she has coming from the kitchen. So I have decided to share with you all my top 5 favorite desserts my grandma has made during the Fall that I absolutely love. 

Chef pouring salt into a bowl Photo by Bank Phrom from Unsplash

Arroz con Leche

  • This simple dessert is made up of rice, milk, and sugar. For toppings, I usually add raisins and cinnamon. I love it warm, but this can also be eaten cold. I usually have a cup of it in the morning before heading to campus. I love to have it with toast or some store-bought waffles. 

Buñuelos

  • Buñuelos are fried fritters that are coated with cinnamon, sugar, and sometimes syrup. I love mine with extra sugar since I have a very strong sweet tooth. These are in my top five because of the crunch they have when you bite them. They’re so good you won't mind the sugar and cinnamon that gets all over you when you bite. 

Tamales

  • I thank my grandma for making tamales all year long, she has normalized these becoming side dishes or a botana, a snack, that usually gets eaten after dinner. That is why I consider them a dessert. Tamales are made up of corn dough, that is spread on a corn husk. Once you spread the corn dough, you may top it with anything you may please. My favorite might have to be pork and red salsa. Obviously, these aren’t sweet but they are a dessert in my eyes since in my household, they are placed with the rest of the desserts discussed in this article. Tamales are good with a cup of champurrado to balance out the spiciness from the salsa. 

Tamales Pixabay.com

Champurado

  • This drink is a hot chocolate type of drink but it is thickened by maize flour. Piloncillo and cinnamon are usually added as well to enrich the flavor. I have to make sure my grandma adds the cinnamon or else it is too bitter for me. This drink and some reheated tamales are amazing

Conchas

  • I wish I could explain how much better a homemade concha is better than a store-bought one from the local panaderia, bakery. Also known as sweet bread, they are soft bread topped with a crispy layer of sugar that can come in many different colors. 

Now, which one is my absolute favorite? Without any hesitation, my grandma's homemade tamales win! They are super quick to reheat and taste absolutely delicious.