California Primary Election

As we should all know by now, the California Primary Election will take place on Tuesday, March 3rd. There are various positions we are voting for in this primary election that will have a big determination in the 2020 Presidential Election. But, the Presidential Nominee should not be the only person we are looking forward to voting for; we need to educate ourselves on who is running in our local districts, counties, and cities. Ultimately, if you have the privilege to vote, go out and do so!

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Quick tips:

  • When are the primary elections in California? 
    • Tuesday, March 3rd
  • What time can I go to vote?
    •  Starting at 7:00AM until 8:00PM!
  • What if I vote by mail but haven’t mailed my ballot yet? 
    • You can drop off your ballot at most voting polls!
  • Not sure if you’re registered to vote? 
    • You can go on the Secretary of State’s site and check under the elections tab!
  • Not registered to vote? 
    • California offers a Same-Day Voter Registration at your local county election offices!
  • Not sure who you’re voting for? 
    • Always remember to look up each individual who is running, whether it be for President, Congress, Assembly, Supervisor, etc. 

 

Why should you vote?

Historically, there are fewer people who vote in primary and local elections because they do not find them to be as important and that is not the case. Not only will you be taking part in choosing the nominee for the President in November, but you will also get to vote for your local Congressmember, Assemblymember, and so on. And you don’t just vote for local officials, but you also vote for measures and propositions too. 

Many people do not find importance in voting because they say they are just one vote and their one vote does not make a difference. But what if that one vote could have gotten a candidate to the November ballot?

And voting is a privilege within itself. Unfortunately, there are millions of people not only in California but throughout the U.S. who cannot vote because of different circumstances. Their voices do not get to be heard. So when we go out to vote, we are not only getting our voices heard, but the voices of millions of other Californians who are not able to vote.

women fists raised in air Original Illustration by Gina Escandon for Her Campus Media