Seasonal Depression And How You Can Improve Your Day to Day Life

The weather is consistently hitting cold numbers, sunny days turned cloudy, and the sun now sets earlier. For some, this time of the season is the best because of the thought of approaching holidays. For others, a type of change in your mood and behavior can result from this seasonal change.  If you are someone who struggles when it gets cold, here are some ways to feel okay during this time.

 

VITAMIN D

Since the sun is not out during this time of the season, the body is being limited to vitamin D intake. Studies show that taking vitamin D can play a role in how one’s mood is and how it can be improved. Speak with a family member or a doctor to see if you are allowed to take vitamin D supplements.

 

WHEN THE SUN IS OUT, EXPOSE YOURSELF

If the sun is out, try your best to go outside for a walk or go for a car ride. If you cannot go outside, open the curtains to your window or blinds and let the sunshine hit your skin. The sun gives you enough Vitamin D which can definitely improve your mood and your day. 

 

EXERCISE

Exercising can improve any person’s mood because it provides you with serotonin. Serotonin is a hormone that makes you feel happy. It allows for all your cells to communicate well and have a positive function in your body. Serotonin is definitely needed if you are someone who struggles with the changes of the season.

 

SPEAK WITH SOMEONE

If you feel like no matter what you do cannot help, speak to someone, whether that be a family member, friend, or therapist. The person you speak to can work with you to help you navigate how you are feeling and can be effective, especially if your mood starts to affect your daily life.

 

Whichever way you decide to work through your feelings, just know that you are not alone. An estimated 10 million Americans suffer from mood changes during seasonal change, especially during the fall and winter seasons. Please reach out if necessary. Have a safe and healthy winter!

 

Source: healthfeed.uofuhealth.org