Meet Brooklynn Earls (SAR '20) —The Queen of Balance

The first time I met Brooklynn was last semester in PH 510 – Intro to Public Health. She immediately struck me as someone I’d like to be friends with (although, that could be because we shared M&M’s in that first meeting). Since then, we’ve bonded over lots of things due to how much time we spend in classes and doing homework together. I recently had the chance to get her perspective and advice on managing life and coursework.

Brooklynn is a rising pre-med senior, majoring in Human Physiology in Sargent. She’s also a Dean’s Host for Sargent, a tutor for the Biology department, a research assistant in the Human Systems Neuroscience Laboratory, and a Global Medical Brigades member. To put it simply, she’s extraordinarily busy, and very involved in every aspect of her time at Boston University!

Credit: Brooklynn Earls

Every pre-med student is busy, but add on all of the extracurriculars and this is what you get. This is a little more than her usual schedule, but this isn’t even the busiest week she’s had. As for her advice on how to balance her responsibilities? She advises to simply use a planner! Brook said, “Write EVERYTHING down. The main reason people forget an assignment or meeting is because they didn’t have it in their calendar. I like to use my Apple calendar so it syncs across all of my devices. I also like to buy cute stationery and make to-do lists.”

But, of course she recognizes that after being at BU for three years, her habits have changed. She said, “My time management skills have definitely changed over time. I’m constantly evaluating my habits and how I can improve them. But, I think the most important aspect of time management is being realistic. Know what you are capable of (which takes trial and error!) and be willing to turn down opportunities, clubs, or events if you don’t have time for them.”

Credit: Brooklynn Earls

As for being a pre-med student, the coursework can be extremely challenging, and many people fail Chemistry in their first semester. When I asked her for advice to give underclassmen who feel like their world is ending as a pre-med student, she said, "Don’t be stuck in your ways! In high school, most people studied by making flashcards, but that doesn’t always work in college. Be willing to self-reflect and evaluate what works best for you. That applies to studying, extracurriculars, and maybe even your social life! Nobody gets it right on the first try, and college is all about trial and error. Think of failures and criticism as opportunities to learn and improve."

If I’ve learned anything from my friendship with Brooklynn, anything is possible. You just have to learn to manage your time and, for God’s sake, take a break sometimes! (I’m always yelling that at her, lmao). This Texan is on her way to big and world-changing things, and I’m incredibly proud to have her as a friend!

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