Women's History Month Facts

According to the official Women’s History Month website, Women’s History Month began in 1981 as Women’s History Week and gradually became the Women’s History Project and then Women’s History Month through a succession of congressional resolutions passed between 1981 and 1994. This year, check out some of the ways to learn about the rich history of United States Women!

 

 

Fashion and Government Uniforms

For those of you interested in fashion or even serving in branches of government, take a look at these articles to see how far women have come in the battle against Uniform Inequality. The National Parks Service has provided illustrations of the original (and somewhat impractical) women’s uniforms on their website.

 

 

Diplomacy and International Relations

International Studies majors, check out this article about Eleanor Roosevelt’s time as chairperson of the UN Commission on Human Rights. Google Arts and Culture has gathered photographs of Roosevelt’s original drafts of an international bill of rights.

 

 

Nursing and Health Professions

The Library of Congress keeps digitized records of newspaper articles on Clara Barton, founder of the American Red Cross, here. Keep an eye out for inspirational quotes and the story of how Clara and her contemporaries, like Florence Nightingale, revolutionized modern medicine.

Journalism and Communications

The Library of Congress has also compiled a list of articles on Ida B. Wells and her crusade against racial inequality and mob violence during the Gilded Age. Use this resource to supplement a research paper or educate and inspire yourself on women and social justice.  

Explore the Federal Women's History Month Website to learn more about the brilliant women that have brought us into the 21st century.