4 Ways Disney's Kim Possible did the Impossible

When people think of Kim now, they think Kardashian. I think Possible. Kim Possible was the epitome of my 2000s childhood. She showed me that I could be a strong, independent female. Disney describes Kim Possible as a “typical high school girl who, in her spare time, saves the world from evil villains.” I would have to argue with Disney that Kim Possible, and the TV show titled the same, is anything but typical.

 

1. The characters refute gender stereotypes

Kim Possible is a strong female lead who exemplifies qualities of both sexes. In the pilot episode “Crush,” Kim’s stereotypically feminine traits are established. She enjoys cheerleading, shopping at Club Banana, and fashion. Juxtaposing these traits are her more masculine qualities which include fighting, defeating her enemies, and mental toughness. It is rare to see a strong female lead, especially in cartoons.

 

Ron Stoppable is the clumsy male lead that is Kim’s “sidekick.” While Kim exudes masculine traits, Ron excels in stereotypically feminine roles, such as art and cooking. Rather than playing sports, he is the team mascot, constantly spending time with Kim and the cheerleading squad. Ron is nurturing as he takes care of his baby sister. Males as nurturers are a rare sight in the media.

 

2. Girls and Guys can be friends without needing to be more

It is true that at the end of the show, Kim and Ron end up together, but throughout the show, they prove that guys and girls can make great friends. In each episode, they defeat villains together, supporting each other along the way. They aren’t the only pairing that exemplifies different sex friendships. Sheila and Dr. Drakken, the villains, have a dynamic duo that never ends in romance but rather revolves around trying to destruct Kim and Ron. Both Kim and Ron and Sheila and Dr. Drakken’s partnerships demonstrate that boys and girls can be best friends and work together.

 

3. Kim Possible fights crime… sometimes in a dress

It’s hard enough walking in heels, but Kim seems to be able to kick ass no matter what she is wearing. Whether it’s her signature cargo pants and black crop top, sparkly blue prom dress, or custom battle suit in “Kim Possible The Movie: So the Drama,” Kim defies all odds and conquers. She is not defined by her attire. Though her midriff showing in her crop top is stereotypically feminine, her crime-fighting ability puts her outfits on the backburner, allowing the audience to focus on Kim.

 

4. Kim is extremely intelligent (and not just for a girl)

Each episode is Kim fighting a new person or team, trying to defeat the bad guys. Kim’s effortlessly witty thoughts allow her to escape stressful situations. In the episode “Tick-Tick-Tick,” Kim is trapped in a map of laser beams, but she uses her compact mirror as a reflection to divert the laser beams away from her. Kim is able to think on the spot which exemplifies her cleverness and intellect.

Not only is Disney Channel’s Kim Possible iconic, but Kim Possible herself is iconic. More shows like Kim Possible need to be depicted in the media to show younger generations that they can do anything they set their minds to, regardless of the stigmas set against them.