Her Campus Logo Her Campus Logo
Her20s

Recent Graduate Hannah Taggart on Women and Gender Studies at Wells

The previous article, “What is happening to the foundation of Wells,” gives some insight about Wells’ current accreditation process. If you haven’t read it, there are certain majors at Wells that are in danger of being cut and this includes Women and Gender Studies.

Criminal Justice, Film & Media Studies and most of the languages are already non- existent for incoming students. The school has been struggiling to keep the humanties and culture alive. We have to wonder, what is a liberal arts degree without WGS, languages, and justice?

 

Women and Gender Studies is a program that is still very much alive at Wells. However, efforts have been made to not allow the program to flourish. There is this misconception about WGS and what it does and is as a program. Based on what the folks involved in the program say, it is fair to define WGS as powerful, useful and vital to Wells College.

 

In honor of the program here is a short interview with a 2018 Wells Graduate of WGS: Hannah Taggart. 

 

Were the things you learned in WGS applicable and helpful after graduation?

The things I learned in WGS are applicable all the time, every day. This program has so deeply influenced how I conceptualize my own personhood and how I relate to others. Its teachings are inextricable from how I move throughout my daily life. I wouldn’t be who I am, and I wouldn’t be pushing myself to grow in the ways that I am, if I hadn’t been a WGS major. 

 

Do you feel having a WGS degree was an advantage to getting a job?

I do. When interviewing with prospective employers I always cite my WGS degree as the foundation through which I was able to develop some of my core strengths. While those are different for every individual, I deeply believe that the WGS program allowed me to come in to tune with myself and my skills. It helped me to understand how to use them to the best of my ability in a way that other programs couldn’t have. Employers are often intrigued by seeing a degree that they may not see very often on my resume. They are typically interested in what that educational background can bring to the table. 

 

As an alumna what would you say to students interested in WGS program?

Do it. You really should. You will thank yourself later. If you don’t plan on majoring or minoring prioritize taking at least one class within the department. Do this as early as possible in your time at Wells. You may change your mind about that major or minor and you don’t want it to be too late. Go to events hosted by the department, go to as many of them as possible, they are some of the best Wells has to offer. 

 

How important was WGS program to your experience at Wells?

I feel like the WGS program was my Wells experience. In my mind they’re not separate, they are the same thing. Aside from the people I met and the relationships I built, it was the most important aspect of my time there. Being a part of that program and having the privilege to learn from those professors pushed me to grow as a person as much as my college experience itself, and that’s huge, and I’m so thankful for it. 

 

This interview just scratches the surface in illustrating WGS’ importance in the world. However, we can see from this interview the influence of WGS during Wells and after. Remember to fight for what you believe in and continue to resist injust systems. #Justice4WGS

doing my work for better days.
Similar Reads👯‍♀️