5 Reasons Why it Pays to Take a Public Speaking Class

 

The thought of standing behind a podium in front of a classroom of people makes my skin crawl and my heart drop to my feet. But, taking a public speaking class has great benefits. The reason I registered for the class initially was to fulfill a major or minor credit in communications. However, I’ve come to realize that even if I’m not a com major, the class will be extremely helpful down the road.

 

  1. It’s an impressive professional skill to have

Public speaking is necessary for many jobs— lawyers, politicians, teachers, even business managers, and human resources specialists. Even if you are in a field where you likely won’t need public speaking, you never know when your boss might make you present a new idea at a board meeting. Public speaking is a skill that it never hurts to have. 

 

  1. You learn to form and convey an argument

Public speaking is similar to writing — it requires research, outlining, forming ideas, and arguing. Being able to organize ideas and convey a message is extremely helpful for problem-solving and critical thinking. Today, with media being accessible and impressionable to anyone, it is crucial to know how to form an argument and persuade.

 

  1. Builds confidence

Like many things in life, public speaking requires practice. Some people are naturals when it comes to speaking, but through the class, I’ve learned that many people are like me— terrified of being in front of an audience. The more speeches I deliver, the better I feel about myself and the development of my skill. I am proud of myself for taking this class and confronting my fear head-on, so it would be an understatement to say that public speaking builds confidence. 

 

  1. Develops communication ability

Being able to communicate competently in our world is important in any career path. With the rise of technology, more people hide behind screens and more people are unable to hold a simple conversation. Being able to speak to a group of strangers, hold eye contact, maintain posture and a professional image might set you apart from peers. 

 

  1. Lends possibility for change

Some of the most influential people in history — Martin Luther King, Mother Teresa, Abraham Lincoln— created change in humanity through speaking. Without effective delivery of their ideas, none of these individuals would have made the impact they did. Being able to captivate an audience’s attention and teach a lesson or make a point is a valuable skill to have.