3 Poets Who Speak Out On Alcohol Abuse

This week, Her Campus Valdosta is spreading awareness around alcohol addiction and abuse. Several studies conducted last year reported a sharp increase in alcohol consumption. Jessica Flores informed in her article on USA Today, “Alcohol consumption has increased by 14% compared with a year ago, including 17% for women...the study also showed a 41% increase in heavy drinking for women” (Flores). While this may urge more legal drinkers to keep a careful eye on their cups, more often than not are people unaware of how much substance they are ingesting. 

Several tactics have been produced to bring awareness to the cause of alcohol abuse, such as interventions or rehabilitation centers. But I believe art is a form that is overlooked when trying to reach somebody personally. Three slam poets took it upon themselves to focus on this topic, and unveil every vulnerable aspect of what this blood-thinner can wield the power to do.

 

  1. 1. Patrick Roche - "21" 

    Patrick Roche is one of the three who writes a poem from his perspective and observes his father’s addiction while aging backward. Each number echoes the heartbreaks any child might face while having a guardian dealing with their demons. This link is to a video where Roche performs his piece entitled “21”, and accomplishes every possible emotion by doing so. 

  2. 2. Valin Page -  “A Poem in Which the Word 'Alcohol' Is Replaced by 'Survival'”

    Valin Page takes a similar approach in point of view with her poem, “A Poem in Which the Word 'Alcohol' Is Replaced by 'Survival'”. She discusses her sister and the traumatizing details of alcohol poisoning and the aftermath of said event. Additionally, Page digs deeper into her definition of sisterhood and family sentiment which can resonate with many listeners. 

  3. 3. Matt Coonan - "Hangover Thoughts

    “Hangover Thoughts”, performed by Matt Coonan, gave me unrelenting goosebumps. From a first-person perspective in a story of waking up, trying to pick up last night's pieces and sort them together, to his incomparable lyricism. Coonan’s tone when speaking to his audience remains on point with his mixture of abrasive voice and vulnerable admissions. This work can relate to anybody who has suffered--or is suffering--from alcohol addiction first-hand. 

I hope at least one of these performances listed above can accompany readers and the hardships they might be facing right now. 

Sources: 

Flores, Jessica. “Drowning Our Sorrows? American Adults Are Drinking More Alcohol amid COVID-19, Study Finds.” USA Today, Gannett Satellite Information Network, 6 Oct.  2020, www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2020/10/05/us-alcohol-consumption-up-...