Four Ways to Survive Winter in Vermont

The University of Vermont is filled with out-of-state students who may have never experienced the cold winters before. Of course, this season requires investing in high-quality snow boots and a thick jacket, but here are a few unique tips about how to survive the cold winters in Vermont.

 

1.     Buy a ski pass.

 

Photo by Les Anderson on Unsplash

My personal favorite mountain in Vermont is Stowe, but there are plenty other popular resorts such as Sugarbush, Bolton, Jay Peak, and Smuggler’s Notch that are in close proximity to the University of Vermont. The college passes are an incredible deal and a must if you prefer to do anything in the winter besides watch movies and drink hot chocolate. Other than the skiing aspect, it’s a great way to explore a new town with friends and get out of Burlington for a few hours. Lastly, you can’t POSSIBLY go to school in Vermont and graduate without learning how to ski. That’s like a waste of enduring the cold for four years straight and nothing to show for it!

  

2.     Make sure you’re getting enough Vitamin D

 

Photo by Jonathan Pielmayer on Unsplash

You’ve probably heard many people compare Vermont winters to Antarctica. With that being said, getting your daily recommended intake of Vitamin D from sunlight alone is often insufficient. The Institute of Medicine recommends that healthy adults consume 600 IU of vitamin D per day. Salmon and milk contain healthy doses of this vitamin, or you can take Vitamin D supplements. The intake of vitamin D during the winter has also been shown to play a possible role in minimizing Seasonal Affective Disorder, otherwise known as SAD.

 

3.     Get a heated blanket.

 

Photo by DAWN HIGHAM on Unsplash

From what I remember Freshman year, the dorm heating really doesn’t cut it when it’s below zero outside. Heated blankets are a necessity throughout the cold Vermont winters whether you’re sleeping, hanging out, watching a movie, etc. There are throw blankets, queen sized blankets, and even blankets with arms on the market! I got my heated blanket at Bed, Bath, and Beyond.

 

4.     Hydrate your skin.

 Photo by Jessica Felicio on Unsplash

When the air outside is cold, your skin starts to get very dry. The most important thing to remember is to constantly moisturize your skin! Personally, my face notices the seasonal change the most. Throughout the winter months, I used moisturizing sheet masks that help to hydrate my skin better than moisturizer.  My two favorite sheet masks in the winter are Leaders Cosmetics Daily Wonders Bye Bye to Dry Mask and their Moisturizing Recovery Mask.