Meet the Woman Behind a "Poop Cult" That Allegedly Killed Somebody

Our world is full of wacky alternative treatments for all kinds of ailments. Many of them can be effective and are backed by real science and research. However, there are many “treatments” that are absolute nonsense with no evidence supporting them whatsoever. Medical quackery becomes a whole new level of awful when it’s actually dangerous – like the practice of Jillian Epperly and her cure-all, diarrhea-inducing juice.

Jillian, a woman from Ohio, believes that her ailments were caused by an overgrowth of the Candida fungus, which 90% of humans have naturally occurring in the gut. Her promise is that her juice, if you can even call it that, purged the fungus from her body and cured her. She now sells the concoction under the title of “Jilly Juice”, claiming that it can cure any condition so long as one follows her protocol, which is drinking up to a gallon of the stuff every day. Jillian claims that her special juice cures everything – cancer, lost limbs, autism, homosexuality, and more. The promise is already nonsensical enough without the added bigotry. Jillian Epperly became infamous after her appearance on Dr. Phil last year, where she went to promote and explain her product. 

What It Is

“Jilly Juice” is cabbage juice that’s been fermented for three days and been loaded with added salt. The recommended dosage, a gallon, contains 28,000mg of sodium. For comparison, the daily recommended sodium intake in 1,500mg. That’s eighteen times more than the amount of sodium you’re supposed to consume in a day. The juice gives the user explosive diarrhea, which Jillian claims is the body purging fungus and parasites. If you excrete or vomit blood, that’s normal according to Jillian. Her explanation for that occurrence is that sometimes, parasites will tear your skin as they leave the body, so it’s proof that the juice is working. The reality is that the diarrhea and vomiting is a result of sodium poisoning, which can absolutely be fatal. Extreme dehydration usually occurs as a result of the salt intake and diarrhea. The juice is intended to be a cure-all for any problem imaginable, and Jillian even recommends giving it to newborns in liu of breastmilk. 

The Scandal

A man named Bruce Wilmot allegedly died as a result of drinking “Jilly Juice” in a desperate attempt to cure his cancer. He was a pancreatic cancer patient who had been failed by chemotherapy, and wasn’t given much time to live. He consulted with Jillian personally, and followed her guidance. Though his death was to be expected in the near future, family members noticed his health take a nosedive when he started Jillian’s protocol, and he died much sooner than anticipated. He went into a coma and died from dehydration. Jillian claims that she was not accountable because he did not follow her “protocol” correctly.

Jillian has written books about her protocol that you can pay money for, and charges members of her forum a monthly fee to participate. You can also pay her for a one-on-one consultation. The point is, this woman is making a lot of money off of her poisonous juice, and a lot of people are buying into it. She has around sixty-thousand followers on Facebook.

The Federal Trade Commission has come after Jillian, demanding she provide evidence for her lofty claims. She has yet to do so. She’s been reported to the Better Business Bureau numerous times. A change.org petition to remove her from Facebook earned around 4,000 signatures. Jillian then attempted to sue the creator of the petition for defamation.

While the story of this crazy woman and her weird juice that cures autism and makes you straight is an entertaining one, it’s certainly scary as well. She has not yet shied away from her dangerous nonsense, and keeps finding new ways to promote her product. Always be mindful and critical of people selling their own “medicine”.

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