Failing is Fundamental to Success

As an Asian-American, specifically Filipina-American, I grew up in a culture that constantly stressed the need to strive without failing. Failing, for the most part, is heavily stigmatized due to its association with a definite inability to thrive and is heavily fueled by the fear of the possible immense consequences of taking risks.

But the possibility of failure should be encouraged and embraced instead. Instead of perceiving the idea of failing, it should be seen as an essential part of success. In fact, failure and risks are a necessary part of success.

This idea is seen a countless number of times, particularly within the tech hub in Silicon Valley. Mark Zuckerberg dropped out of Harvard during his second year to focus on his project, Facebook, which has grown to be one of the most successful and well-known tech companies in the 21st century.

Instead of failure being seen as the gatekeeper from success, it should be seen as an opportunity to learn. Too often people forget the value of failing due to the realization and reality that they did not accomplish a goal. The idea that failing diminishes their pride and dignity due to failure’s association with inability when failure has always been the drive for the evolution of all human beings.

The more we learn from our own failures, the better human beings we can all be. This happens every day. Failing a class teaches a student what they should and should not do in order to be a better student the same way a failed relationship teaches both men and women how to better love and care for their future significant others.

Failure not only pushes for evolution and growth but also allows us the ability to see our faults and flaws that human beings may not yet be ready to admit or see and, by admitting those faults and flaws, our evolution takes place.