Schitt’s Creek: Not What I Expected, Exactly What I Needed

The TV show Schitt’s Creek has risen in popularity over the past year, and I often hear references from it in conversation and on the internet. It took a while for the show to catch on. It has been out since 2015 but only got popular relatively recently.

I, like many others, am guilty of initially overlooking the show. The title did little to convince me of its value. I watched the first episode after having it recommended to me, and all I saw were spoiled characters thrust into a grimy town. The kind of crass humour I expected the show to feature wasn’t appealing, so I never made it past the first episode. Big mistake. After giving it another shot last month, I fell in love with its clever humour and the quirky characters that wormed their way into my heart.

Schitt’s Creek centers on a wealthy family that loses all of their assets except for a small rural town called Schitt’s Creek, which leaves much to be desired. For the Rose family, who are used to living in the lap of luxury, the adjustment to their new life is difficult. The show follows their efforts to rebuild their lives, and though they initially long to escape the town, they end up building deep connections and finding a warm community among the residents.

The biggest hurdle for me was that the characters weren’t initially relatable. I mean, who can relate to ending up penniless after living life as a millionaire? I’m sure there is a niche for that, but it certainly doesn’t hit home with the broke uni students. They were, to put it bluntly, annoying and spoiled. After some time though, the Roses start learning and growing. I got attached, rooting for their success despite cringing at their behaviour at the beginning of the series. Actually, that’s what kept me absorbed in the show: the growth the characters go through over the course of six seasons is striking and surprisingly inspirational. Not to mention the show is Canadian, which provides a little burst of national pride in my heart. 

Aside from the great writing, the acting in Schitt’s Creek is nothing short of masterful. Dan and Eugene Levy, and all of the cast, play their complex characters expertly, creating distinct mannerisms that made each character unique and oh-so-lovable. Catherine O’Hara played the spectacle that is Moira Rose so fantastically, she was in her own universe entirely. She sticks out the most in the town, but never sacrifices one bit of her startling personality.

This show is genuinely sweet and touching. I often found myself getting emotional, which is an unusual effect for a sitcom — especially considering its title. Schitt’s Creek is clever, warm and a deviation from the other sitcoms out there. If you give more than the first few episodes a shot, you won’t be disappointed, I promise.