6 Video Essays to Procrastinate To

If you’re out of things to watch on Netflix and you just aren’t ready to get started on those readings and assignments, consider distracting yourself with a video essay. These videos will entertain, educate and give you something to think about. Let these video essayists lead you down the rabbit hole...

  1. 1. Lindsay Ellis - “Dear Stephanie Meyer”

    Lindsay is undeniably the queen of video essays. She’s detailed, brings in the perspectives and voices of her fellow YouTubers, and her topics come out of left field in the best way. If you’ve been enjoying the recent Twilight renaissance online, you will love this video.

  2. 2. Sarah Z - “Tumblr's Failed Convention: The Story of Dashcon”

    Sarah is the girl to go to for fandom retrospectives that you didn’t know you needed. You might have been on Tumblr back in the early 2010s, or maybe you don’t know what Tumblr is (lucky you!). Either way, this video is an experience.

  3. 3. Hbomberguy - “Sherlock Is Garbage, And Here's Why”

    I put this one on when I just need to see something be comprehensively and brutally roasted. That is what Hbomberguy does to BBC’s Sherlock. If you liked the series before, I dare you to not be convinced otherwise by the end of this film-length essay.

  4. 4. dangelowallace - “The exact moment Shane Dawson's career ended: 12:37 PM, 06/30/2”

    Confused about all of that internet drama from that one time? Don’t worry, D’Angelo has you covered. In this video, he takes a well-researched look into the history of missteps by YouTuber Shane Dawson that led to him being effectively cancelled this summer (again, for the billionth time.)

  5. 5. tiffanyferg - “Hustle Culture, Workaholism, and Toxic Productivity”

    The way that Tiffany breaks down popular internet trends and criticizes Millennial and Gen Z culture makes her required viewing for anyone that spends a lot of time online.

  6. 6. coldcrashpictures - “Should we Still be Watching 'Gone with the Wind?'” 

    In this coldcrashpictures video, confront ideas of why we study classic films, how we study them, and whether the positive elements of Gone With the Wind should overrule its racist context and content.

Find all of these videos here, and make sure to check out our channel while you’re at it. Happy procrastinating!