Stop Telling Me I'll Never Get a Job

Every college student has fallen prey to the paralyzing questions of “what is your major?” and “what do you plan to do after you graduate?” For some, post-grad plans are concrete and easily visualized. For others, there are more hoops to jump through when searching for career placement. Regardless of how difficult or easy it is for an individual to find a job after graduation, their degree is valid.

There are certain professions that carry a large amount of honor and respect with their title- doctor, nurse, teacher and police officer among them. These professions are easily recognized by others and seen as integral to the functioning of society. What about the professions that aren’t as commonly known or understood? They are just as important.

Within colleges, there are majors that may seem “invisible.” These are fields that contribute largely to society, but gain little or no recognition. Invisible majors can include: sociology, women’s and gender studies, communications, philosophy and anthropology, to name a few. Individuals pursuing degrees in these fields may be familiar with the popular remark, “what are you going to do with that?!

While these majors may not be among the most popular, they are just as valuable as any other. Individuals in these fields make waves and foster change in a variety of ways- they are social workers, government officials, researchers, higher education officials, counselors and businessmen. Many misunderstood majors are broad and can seem vague. The beauty in this reality, however, is that they may be applied to a variety of fields and disciplines. The wider your canvas, the more room you have to paint.

Choosing a major is a difficult process. Some students go with narrower fields and have a single dream job in mind. Others, such as myself, enter broader fields of study and like to have a variety of options available to them. I am a sociology major with minors in journalism and women’s, gender and sexuality studies. I want to serve the public and I aim to work with survivors of domestic violence and sexual assault or individuals suffering from mental health and addiction issues.

My major may seem confusing to many people and I am often told that I will never find a job. The fact of the matter is this: I will find a job, but I don’t need it to be glamorous and I don’t need to show it off to people. Being in the public eye will not validate my work; my satisfaction and ability to help others will. I love my major and I would choose it again in a heartbeat.

While my major is not one of the more popular ones among college students today, the work I will be doing is much-needed. Being invisible isn’t always a bad thing. For those who have said I will never get a job, I offer two words: watch me.