Glass Movie Review

 

 

 

Glass, currently in theatres, has become the talk of current box offices. Written, produced and directed by M. Night Shyamalan, Glass ends the trilogy of Unbreakable and Split. Bruce Willis, Samuel L. Jackson and Spencer Treat Clark reprise their roles from Unbreakable, while James McAvoy and Anya Taylor-Joy return from the second film, Split.

Going into the theatre, I had not personally seen either film that precedes Glass. However, I learned that you could still enjoy and understand the plot without having seen the other two. While there are a few plot points that appear a tad confusing, it does not make or break the film.

As someone who isn’t particularly into Marvel or DC superhero movies, Glass created an intriguing twist on the classic superhero story. It was refreshing to see a movie like this that wasn’t a part of the Marvel and DC franchise and I hope that writers continue to create more stories like this in the future.

Glass was truly captivating, and kept my eyes glued to the screen the entire time. As a thriller, it was nowhere near as frightening as I was expecting, but was dripping with drama and intensity throughout the entire film. By combining the characters and stories from Unbreakable and Split, the story is told fantastically through their world.

The performance of James McAvoy was truly breathtaking as he was constantly changing character. His character Kevin Crumb/The Horde, has 23 personalities in which his body chemistry changes within each one. It was truly insane to see how he transformed from the seemingly harmless “The Horde” to a cannibalistic, raging “The Beast” that had superhuman abilities. If you need a reason to see this movie, have it be James McAvoy. He will make you laugh and pull at all your heart strings. With his multiple personalities it is hard to form a concrete opinion on him, but he makes the film INCREDIBLE.

 

 

Samuel L. Jackson's character appeared as an enigma to me at first - probably because I hadn’t seen either of the two previous films. However, by the end of the film you are able to get a decent grip on who Mr. Glass truly was. He goes from being the good-guy to the bad-guy to the not so bad-guy that wrenches your heart.

 

 

Bruce Willis makes you fall in love with his David Dunn as he encompasses the typical “hero” role. Out to save the world from the bad guys, he is forced to make difficult decisions after being held in a mental hospital with “The Beast” and Mr. Glass. It is evident that he has a fearful past with Mr. Glass (that is shown in Unbreakable) and simply wants to save the victims of “The Beast.” His relationship with his son is heartwarming, and he truly appears as the protagonist of the story.

 

 

Overall, I highly recommend that you head into theatres to see Glass as soon as you can. This is a film that is truly worth all the hype surrounding it, and I can’t wait to watch Unbreakable and Split to learn even more about these captivating characters.