Book Review: Dark Places by Gillian Flynn

 

 

The author of the critically acclaimed novel turned movie ‘Gone Girl’ is back at it again with another gripping read that will leave readers on the edge of their seats.

‘Dark Places’ follows Libby Day, a young woman whose family was infamously murdered on their farm in the middle of nowhere, Kansas, when she just a child. The only other survivor of the tragic killings was her older brother, Ben, who now sits in prison serving a life sentence as the suspected murderer.

Trying to escape this childhood trauma, Libby has turned into a hermit, and spends her days in solitude in the comfort of her own home. She never visits her brother, she never goes back to see her family farm, and she certainly doesn’t dare to replay that horrific night’s events in her head.

However, when she notices her life savings are running dangerously low, Libby decides to respond to a letter she received from a man named Lyle. He offers to pay her money in return for secrets and information about her family, whose story has grown notorious in the Midwest. Lyle heads a “Kill Club”, a group of people who are obsessed with unsolved murders, and this would provide perfect content for one of their meetings.

Little does Libby know, she will soon regain her own interest in uncovering the truth behind her family’s murder. Together, her and Lyle work to investigate every lead, often putting themselves in life threatening situations to do so. After all secrets are revealed, they finally find the answer they were looking for, and no one will see it coming.

This book lives true to its “dark” namesake, and is certainly not for the faint of heart. But for those who find themselves intrigued by mysteries, horror, and even a touch of satanic worshipping, this book is for you. Although the beginning moves slowly with a majority of  background information, it soon picks up and leaves you turning pages.

‘Dark Places’ is one of those books where everything comes together at the end, and leaves readers wondering how they didn’t put the pieces together themselves. Flynn does a great job at connecting readers to her story - she tells a tale of issues we all know too well : family, money, guilt, and greed.