Who Made Your Clothes?

Join the nonprofit organization, Fashion Revolution’s movement! Happening from April 23rd through the 29th, they are calling out for a fair, safe, and cleaner fashion industry; by asking brands #whomademyclothes?

“On the 5th anniversary of the Rana Plaza factory collapse, which killed 1,138 people and injured many more in 2013, we encourage millions of people to ask brands #whomademyclothes and demand greater transparency in the fashion supply chain” (fashionrevolution.org).

For those of you who are confused as to what Rana Plaza factory collapse is, here is an explanation: In Bangladesh in 2013 on April 24th there was a structural failure of the Savar building. It is considered as the deadliest structural failure accident in modern human history… deadliest GARMENT FACTORY ACCIDENT in human history.

The building was made up of clothing factories, a bank, apartments, and shops. This all in one scenario was not the only problem leading to the horrific event. The building was built on a filled in pond, while an additional three floors were placed against the original permit. Mind you it was built with substandard construction materials. The original purpose for the building was to be made for commercial use but instead was used for an industrial purpose. The structure as a whole could not bear the heavyweight and moment of the machinery. At one point during the day of the collapse the building was declared unsafe and it was evacuated due to a TV channel recording the damaged spaces. Later that day, managers had threatened the workers who refused to come back to work, a withholding of a month’s pay.

There were 1,138 deaths and approximately 2,500 people injured.

You have a voice and the power to create change within the fashion industry! The clothing items you are wearing right now in this moment were created by someone. That someone put their hard work into creating those garments. Hard work pays off correct? Well for some, wrong; but that is NOT RIGHT!

An individual should not be worked as if they are a robotic machine being turned on and off. An individual should be given proper hours for a human being. Machines can be fixed and repaired once broken down, but human beings should not be forced to work until they are worked down. Dust and dirt are what machines can be capable of living in. People should not even be allowed to step foot in a building where the conditions are so poor that they are automatically being put in harms way.

Therefore not only this week but whenever you are getting dressed, undressed, shopping in-store or online the people who made your clothes should be considered. The clothing on your back may define you and your status, but the clothing should not misrepresent or obscure the morals and ethics behind the concept of the people’s working status and conditions that made them. Knowing the fact that your clothing was sourced, produced, and purchased all in a safe, clean, and fair way makes all the difference in every aspect!

Join the movement! Email a brand, the Fashion Revolution makes it easy and painless with their template only adding your name and email address. Online there is also a template for a tweet for asking a brand who made your clothes. Post on Instagram and show your tag label asking the brand who made your clothes. 

Be creative with it if you wish! Sabrina Batiz has been discussing fair trade workers through her posts on Instagram. She has been spreading awareness to her followers educating them on the movement and the industry, while also starting conversation (which creates CHANGE)! She is all about sustainable fashion and you can check out her work at https://www.instagram.com/srbatiz/ and https://www.sabrinabatiz.com 

For more information go to: https://www.fashionrevolution.org 

Photos in order by:

Cover Photo: Emily Eckhoff … made your clothes https://www.instagram.com/emilykateeckhoff/ 

Tajiya Holland … made your clothes https://www.instagram.com/t_holland/ 

Sabrina Batiz … made your clothes https://www.instagram.com/srbatiz/