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The Anti-Slut Shaming Podcast

Guys We Fucked is an anti-slut shaming podcast. It’s actually called THE anti-slut shaming podcast. The show was launched in December 2013 by two comics, Krystyna Hutchinson and Corinne Fisher. The two had been working together as a comedy duo by the name “Sorry About Last Night” since 2011. Corinne had recently had her heart broken by a long term boyfriend, called Krystyna, and half jokingly said, “what if we made a podcast and talked to all the guys we fucked and called it “Guys We Fucked”.” To which, Krystyna said “YES.”

image credit: krystyna hutchinson and corinne fisher: sorryaboutlastnightcomedy.com

The podcast was created and started by interviewing men that they’d slept with or had relationships with, but soon expanded into talks with “titans in the comedy and sex industries”, as described by their website. In an interview with Vogue, the women say that the podcast is for them. They themselves are living, breathing, young females in New York City who are more than used to all the BS that comes with being a woman, and though the podcast started with a following of women their age, it soon expanded to be a huge array of a million+ listeners of all backgrounds and identities.

Why broadcast conversations with your exes about your sex life to the entire world? Why would you want that level of vulnerability? Krystyna says, in the same Vogue interview, that they created the podcast to talk about sex in a way that they wanted to hear sex talked about. To talk about anything they wanted, and some things that they don’t really want to, with no boundaries or censorship, and to, working outward from themselves, erase the stigmas surrounding female sexuality, and of talking about sex in general.

In addition to the interviews with guys they’ve fucked, sex workers, sex therapists, comedians, rappers, friends, mothers, fathers, public figures, and etc., Corinne and Krystyna read emails from listeners on air. Most of these emails contain sensitive information and are often about extremely personal struggles or experiences that one is facing. The women keep the identities of these individuals confidential unless given permission, and they give their input and advice on the situation. A lot of these emails include stories of sexual assault, rape, abusive relationships, slut shaming and misogyny, among other things. They read these emails, talk about the subjects, and try to give advice not because they believe that they have the authority and position to tell people what to do, but because those rape, slut-shaming, and abuse are, unfortunately, part of the world we live in, and often are direct effects of misogyny and silence about misunderstandings about sexuality. Discussing real experiences, though they are often traumatic, is a huge part of opening the doors to a broader understanding of healthy sexuality and relationships and making the smaller voices heard in cases of injustice and unbalanced advantage.

Personally, I’ve always been extremely interested in learning about and talking about all aspects of sex and sexuality. I started listening to the podcast about a year ago, and through binging all the old episodes and keeping up with new ones, my viewpoint and bank of knowledge has expanded dramatically. The conversations that are had and the people whom they are had with are extraordinarily interesting and cover topics that I had no idea existed, but am so eager to learn more about. Guys We Fucked has opened my mind up so much, and has truly made me believe that nothing is weird. It’s made me a better feminist by bringing light to issues that I was unaware of in my life as a middle class white women, and it’s made me a better partner by giving me the confidence and openness to have better and broader conversations about my own relationship and sexuality. I recommend that anyone, regardless of their beliefs or political standing or identity listen to the Guys We Fucked podcast. It’s not only hilarious, but eye-opening and mind-blowing.