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Modern Books I Hope Will Be Considered Classics One Day

Various novels have sprung into our “to be read” lists from TikTok, mandatory school readings, or film adaptations. There are so many great classics in our modern-day libraries that you can’t help but beg to question, “if there are so many incredible modern pieces of literature, which books will be considered classics in 50 years?”

1. Where The Crawdads Sing – Delia Owens 

Meet Kya: An ordinary, run-of-the-mill teenager. Now picture a perfect small town with a murder mystery on its hands. The star quarterback of the high school football team has been murdered and all eyes are trained on Kya – the odd “marsh girl” of town. The book explores various topics including murder, mystery, romance and survival against all odds. Take a chance with Kya and experience the beautiful imagery that Owens has played out in her debut novel. 

2. The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo – Taylor Jenkins Reid

An incredible novel that follows a reporter learning the infamous secret of celebrity and icon Evelyn Hugo. The book describes incredible plot twists and unique character developments. All secrets are left out for the world to know in this tell-all novel. Various themes are discussed including societal norms, race, misogyny and sexuality. The book has an overarching message that life is short and must be spent doing what you love, surrounded by the people who appreciate it. 

3. The Book Thief – Markus Zusak

A present novel that, without a doubt, will be considered one of the greatest pieces of English literature to have ever been written – if it is not considered so already. The book takes place in Germany during the time of World War II from 1939-1943. Follow Lisel, a compassionate and curious young girl who quickly adapts to the ever-changing situation that is her life – and continues to see her life unfold as death accompanies her at every turn. 

4. A little life – hanya yanagihara

An incredible novel centred around four friends who have travelled from a small town all the way to the Big Apple to make their mark on the world. Make sure to look at content warnings before reading the book as it touches on various aspects of substance abuse and mental health. In the novel, I found that beauty and pain intertwined perfectly; Yanagihara could not have expressed the characters’ emotions any better than being real people.

Kinza Yaqoob

Ryerson '23

Kinza is a third-year student at Ryerson University with a concentration in Biology and Human Anatomy. She loves to read and learn about things she's passionate about.  When she isn't studying she can be found reading or watching Gilmore Girls while sipping her third iced coffee of the day.
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