Welcome To The Dinner Party

Judy Chicago a self named artist who has studied many different forms of art. One of her most well known art projects is a piece called The Dinner Party. The Dinner Party is a giant art piece composed of 39 individual plates. Each plate is decorated to represent a individual woman who had historical or cultural significance. The plates are arranged in an open equilateral triangle 13 plates per side. The floor of this triangle shaped table is triangle shaped glazed tiles that consists of 998 names plastered across the floor all of significant women. The floor could be known as the heritage floor.

Source

Each plate is a china plate, she used the medium of China painting to make a political statement. Many women of the time would paint tea cups and Chicago thought it was horrible to see talent be raised in painting teacups so she took it to the next level and painted with the China plates, making a political statement in a semi traditional woman’s media. Most plates do have a resemblance to the taboo topic of the females genitalia. The art installment took six years to complete and and $250,000 and lots more volunteer hours.

 

Some women included in the sculpture include Susan B. Anthony, Hatshepsut, Sojourner Truth, And Emily Dickinson. It’s in a form of a triangle since a triangle has been used to represent females and femininity. The equilateral triangle for the fact that it would equal equality. They start off as flat designs and then they gradually become more three dimensional.

Source

It was originally on display in 1979, later being retired to storage then being put back on display in 1996 by going from one place to another all the way up till 2007. From 2007 till current day it is on display at a museum in Brooklyn New York, where it is on permanent display. You can get into the museum for $19, $10 with a student id and free if you are under the age of 19. It is one of the first big feminist art installments, each plate hand painted and decorated with a napkin and a chalice to go with the plate.

 

 

 

Links/Work cited:

Chicago, Judy. The Dinner Party: A Symbol of our Heritage. New York: Anchor (1979).

https://www.brooklynmuseum.org/visit/hours_admission/museum_hours