3 Simple Ways You Can Help in the Aftermath of the California Fires

You may have heard that, after weeks of tireless work, the California wildfires have finally been contained. Thousands of people lost their homes and nearly 100 people have been found dead, but hundreds of residents are still unaccounted for. As California faces these difficult times, it’s hard to stand by and not help. Here are three simple ways you can help in the wake of the deadliest and most destructive wildfire in California’s history.

Donate

Sending money is the easiest way to help after disaster strikes. Though sending supplies like food, water, clothing and other necessities seems helpful, it ultimately does a disservice to the affected population. Volunteers, rather than helping those who need it, need to divert their attention to sorting clothing and supplies. Donating money is truly the best way to help in times of need. This reputable website, Charitynavigator.org, gives you several options of organizations in California to donate money to. The Los Angeles Fire Department is also seeking donations, along with the Red Cross and the Salvation Army.

Raise Awareness

At least 85 people have been killed in the wildfires and the numbers are still rising. There are hundreds of people still missing as California residents begin to clean up the wreckage of this disaster. Educate yourself on how fires of this magnitude start (there’s a great article by The New York Times and one by The Sacramento Bee that discuss how this happens). Not all wildfires are caused by campfires gone wrong, but this way of thinking is something taught to us from a young age as we learn about fire safety. Learn more about the many ways that wildfires can start.

Do Some Research

Several reputable news sources, such as The New York Times, ABC and Accuweather have been following the fires since they began. NPR published a piece on the firefighters who fought against the flames and Wired has an article about how the state of California has been affected by climate change. Check out the linked articles to explore more ideas on how you can help and to learn more about how California will recover from here.

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