Review: 'Mindhunter' on Netflix

Crime shows will never go out of style. That’s something I’ve accepted ever since I started watching one of my all-time favorites, “Law & Order: SVU.” People love watching cops fight crimes and track down serial killers. Luckily for anyone with access to Netflix and an unwavering love for psychological crime dramas, “Mindhunter” has you covered.

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"Mindhunter” follows FBI agent Holden Ford (Jonathan Groff) as he joins Bill Tench (Holt McCallany) riding around the country doing Road School. While traveling, the two happen to find themselves investigating various crimes that local stations need help with.

Meantime, we are shown snippets of another story. There isn’t much we are told, just shown various clips of a man. The audience is given no conclusion, no name, and even when the season ends, there is no catharsis for the strange man in the opening scenes.

"Mindhunter” also shows how Holden and Bill start studying newly-called serial killers. The duo does this by stopping in select cities while working on Road School to interview these serial killers across the country.

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The story remains interesting throughout the season, making sure that the pace is set well and that the audience doesn’t get bored or overwhelmed. With content as heavy as serial killers and rapists, keeping that pace even with more lighthearted scenes is difficult.

Directed by none other than David Fincher, it’s no surprise that this show flows easily and is one of the more binge-able shows currently on Netflix. Fincher (“Fight Club,” “The Social Network” and “Gone Girl”) is no stranger to gruesome stories, and his ability to find the best camera angles and make sure each actor delivers their lines the best way they can, solidifies that no one else could’ve done this show as well as him.

The acting is incredible. Asking someone to play a serial killer and rapist is a hard job, but having that actor do it well and make it believable is nothing short of incredible. Ed Kemper (Cameron Britton) is a killer that is often interviewed throughout the season, and his calm demeanor is only misleading after learning what exactly Ed has done to earn his place in prison.

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At ten episodes long, and about an hour an episode, the show is lengthy. It’s been argued that “Mindhunter” would have been better as a movie, but the amount of detail that Fincher puts into every episode only proves that it should stay as a series. With a 9/10 on IMDB and a 95 percent rating on Rotten Tomatoes, why wouldn’t you want to start binging now?

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