7 Must-Read Books by Female Comedians

Zoom fatigue is real and, if you're anything like me, you’ve been feeling it already this semester. This fatigue has also spilled over into any device I watch such as the television or my phone, so in an effort to limit my screen time, I decided to take up reading. 

 

Let me preface this by saying that I am not the best reader. Whenever I pick up a book, especially if it is of the informational variety, I flip a few pages and end up putting the book down to watch Netflix or scroll through Tik Tok. But one day while strolling through the public library, I came across a book by Retta, who is most commonly known as Donna Meagle from Parks and Recreation. I was a fan of hers on the show and had seen some of her stand-up comedy work, so I decided to check it out. I read this book in 2 days. Let me repeat, 2 days. This was a record for me! The book was funny, relatable, easy to read, and, most importantly, written by someone who deserves more attention.

 

This book sparked in me an interest to read 7 books by female comedians, with the hope that it will not only help me become a reader but get off my laptop! If you want a great escape from your monotonous, school work-filled life or the endless pits that are social media feeds, check out these books below!

  1. 1. So Close to Being the Sh*t, Y’all Don’t Even Know

    In So Close to Being the Sh*t, Y’all Don’t Even Know, Parks and Recreation star Retta takes us on her not-so-meteoric rise from roaches to riches (well, rich enough that she can buy $15,000 designer handbags yet scared enough to know she’s always a heartbeat away from ramen with American cheese).

  2. 2. Bossypants

    In Bossypants, Tina Fey’s story can, at last, be told. From her youthful days as a vicious nerd to her tour of duty on Saturday Night Live; from her passionately halfhearted pursuit of physical beauty to her life as a mother eating things off the floor; from her one-sided college romance to her nearly fatal honeymoon—from the beginning of this paragraph to this final sentence.

  3. 3. Yes Please

    In Amy Poehler’s highly anticipated first book, Yes Please, she offers up a big juicy stew of personal stories, funny bits on sex and love and friendship and parenthood and real-life advice (some useful, some not so much), like when to be funny and when to be serious. Powered by Amy’s charming and hilarious, biting yet wise voice, Yes Please is a book full of words to live by.

  4. 4. Is Everyone Hanging Out Without Me?

    In Is Everyone Hanging Out Without Me?, Mindy Kaling invites readers on a tour of her life and her unscientific observations on romance, friendship, and Hollywood, with several conveniently placed stopping points for you to run errands and make phone calls. Mindy Kaling really is just a Girl Next Door—not so much literally anywhere in the continental United States, but definitely if you live in India or Sri Lanka.

  5. 5. The Misadventures of Awkward Black Girl

    A reflection on Issa Rae’s own unique experiences as a cyber pioneer yet universally appealing, The Misadventures of Awkward Black Girl is a book no one—awkward or cool, black, white, or other—will want to miss. 

  6. 6. The Girl with the Lower Back Tattoo

    In The Girl with the Lower Back Tattoo, Amy Schumer mines her past for stories about her teenage years, her family, relationships, and sex and shares the experiences that have shaped who she is - a woman with the courage to bare her soul to stand up for what she believes in, all while making us laugh.

  7. 7. Dear Girls: Intimate Tales, Untold Secrets, & Advice for Living Your Best Life

    Ali Wong’s sharp insights and humor are even more personal in Dear Girls: Intimate Tales, Untold Secrets, & Advice for Living Your Best Life. She shares the wisdom she's learned from a life in comedy and reveals stories from her life off stage, including the brutal singles life in New York (i.e. the inevitable confrontation with erectile dysfunction), reconnecting with her roots (and drinking snake blood) in Vietnam, tales of being a wild child growing up in San Francisco, and parenting war stories. Though addressed to her daughters, Ali Wong's letters are absurdly funny, surprisingly moving, and enlightening (and disgusting) for all.