Disposable Camera Experience & Review

When my birthday came around earlier this year, I had the idea to ask for a disposable camera. I’d always been fascinated by film photography, but knew I didn’t have the money, knowledge, or skill to tackle it wholeheartedly just yet. I was also interested in the idea of taking a photo and not knowing what it looks like right away. I liked the thought of there being some time in the process, and then being rewarded with a surprise later. So, I asked for the Fujifilm QuickSnap Disposable Camera.

This disposable camera has a flash switch as well as enough film for 27 photos. It’s small, light, and very easy to use. You just wind it up and click a button! Throughout the spring and summer, I took my disposable camera everywhere.

Before I was to depart for Mount Holyoke, I had used up my film and was ready to have my photos developed. For this process, I decided to use a company called The Darkroom. To my surprise, having my film developed was extremely easy! All I had to do was go to The Darkroom and click the disposable camera option under "film developing." When making an order through The Darkroom, you are sending out your camera for development. The Darkroom sends back a free digital file of your photos, free physical negatives, a free photo disc, as well as optional prints for a small extra fee. Once I paid online, The Darkroom sent me a shipping label and all I had to do was box up my camera with my order number and send it on its way.

A short amount of time later, I was sitting in my dorm scrolling through emails when I saw that not only had my prints been shipped, but also the digital file was ready. I excitedly downloaded it, and for the very first time was able to see all of the snapshots I’d taken over the summer.

The results that I got were just as I’d hoped, and it made me so happy. The Fujifilm QuickSnap has the capacity for capturing vibrant colors. I learned a lot about photography through this process. For example, in different lighting, I discovered that darker settings with shadows have a sort of mellow, grainy green effect. Also, that photos of high exposure come out clear and bright in their full radiance. Though not shown, portraits come out beautifully, too. With good contrast, color, definition, and that slightly fuzzy vintage texture, what’s not to love? Some of my photos came out better than others, but that’s the fun of learning! Now, I definitely know what degree of darkness requires the flash to be on—too dim and the image is too foggy. All in all, I was extremely pleased with my experience with this disposable camera and this process of developing film. My next move is to put them in an album to keep here at school, with memories I’ll never forget!

Should you decide to try out disposable cameras for yourself, you can buy the Fujifilm QuickSnap on Amazon. Happy snapping!

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