Worst to First : The Films of Wes Anderson

Wes Anderson is auteur in a very unique style of filmmaking. His films are blend of quirky humor and production design that helps tell the story in such a way that almost sometimes feel deadpan and lifeless, but manages to have life. Here are his films from worst to best. 

9. Moonrise Kingdom 

This almost feels like a bad parody of a Wes Anderson movie. Poor leading child actors, a film that felt almost too reliant on style over substance, and a story that never realy helms through from start to finish, instead relying too much on the quirkiness of its characters, drowning in its own self indulgent pretentiousness. 

Best Performance : Edward Norton as Scout Master Ward

 

 

8. Bottle Rocket

Anderson's debut film is least like what his career film style would be, and in some ways, it shows why he decided to change his style. Although the film has some funny moments and The Wilson Brother of Luke and Owen are fun to watch, the story wears thin and it simply isn't that memorable. 

Best Performance: Owen Wilson as Dignan

 

 

7. The Life Aquatic with Steve Zissou

Bill Murray is awesome as the titular protagonist who goes on a sea expedition with his team with the hopes of killing a shark that killed his best friend. Although it certainly has its funny moments, this one becomes a bit more forgettable over time and wears out its welcome after maybe a second view. 

Best Performance: Bill Murray as Steve Zissou

 

6. The Royal Tenenbaums

 

Although often praised as his best work, this was only the beginning of what Anderson could do as a filmmaker. With a cast of big name actors and weird characters put together in a story full of family dysfunction, love, and growth, The Royal Tenenbaums is a touching film with some pretty amazing moments from the all star cast, particularly, Gene Hackman as the lying scheming dad who tries to get back into his family's life. 

Best Performance: Luke Wilson as Richie Tenenbaum

 

 

5. The Darjeeling Limited 

Three brothers go on a trip to find their mother. That's the movie. But what follows is a film about family once lost but found again through the experience of a journey that won't be forgotten. The trio of Wilson, Brody, and Schwartzmann is entertaining to watch as the dysfunction of their relationships with one another is the driving force of the story's humor and heart.

Best Performance : Adrien Brody as Peter

 

4. The Grand Budapest Hotel

This is one of Anderson's most complete stories as we follow a story of the end of days for the Grand Budapest Hotel during times of war. In a story where murder, assassins, and espionage take place, Budapest is a wild ride with hilarious performances and a bittersweet and somber finale. A film that is basked with many different thematical elements and one of the most mature works from Anderson. 

Best Performance: Ralph Fiennes as M. Gustave 

 

3. Isle of Dogs

Perhaps this film can climb higher with more views, but there's something so perfect about this gorgeously animated film with heart from Anderson. With homages to the great Akira Kurosawa and a film that is for the most part, amazingly paced with great voice performances, Isle of Dogs is one of the most entertaining animated film you'll ever see. 

Best Voice Performance: Jeff Goldblum as Duke

 

2. Fantastic Mr. Fox

In his first stop-motion animated feature, Anderson takes a children's book and turns it into a gorgeously animated film with tremendous voice acting and humor that is entertaining and enjoyable for both adults and kids. With so many memorable characters and fantastic production design, this film is fantastic from start to finish. 

Best Voice Performance: George Clooney as Mr. Fox

 

1. Rushmore 

Rushmore is, and always will be, Wes Anderson's finest work. The pacing is perfect, the humor is amazing, the drama feels genuine and never forced, and the story of a student vs industrialist over the affections of a teacher is simple yet done so creatively and hilariously. Rushmore is near perfection and you can thank this film as the re-emergence of Bill Murray's career.

Best Performance: Bill Murray as Herman Blume