Why I Am A Women's Studies Minor

My first Women’s and Gender Studies course I took at Kutztown University was an LGBTQ class.  Many chuckled at why I would take such a class or why it was even being offered.  Despite different opinions made by others on the topic, I felt it would be a class I would do well in, but also would make me become educated on different genders and sexualities.  I found myself always looking forward to class.  From talking to other students and professors, I learned about the Women’s and Gender Studies minor that is offered. I scrolled through the list of different topics I could take within this minor.  There were classes such as Marriage and Family, Women Writers Around the World, Women in the Arts, Popular Culture and more.  

Women’s and Gender Studies or now known as Women’s, Gender and Sexual Studies is best described as providing opportunities to increase appreciation and knowledge of the physical universe, of human society, and of cultural diversity, as well as responding to the diverse needs of society by ensuring equal access to its educational programs and services without regard for race, gender, creed, age, or national origin.  I won’t lie; there were individuals who questioned why I would take such classes and what my purpose was with them.  I personally feel that people hear courses start with “women,” they automatically assume it is strictly for women or “men-hating classes.”  I am here to say they are CLEARLY not. 

These classes have educated me on more topics than I could’ve imagined. I gained a better insight on art as well as famous woman artists.  During my class, I was lucky to go see “The Dinner Party” by Judy Chicago, a famous feminist piece located in Brooklyn with a total of thirty-nine place settings of women throughout history, as well as another 999 women inscribed on tiles.  I read powerful books and stories by women who fought for their voice.  I gained a better education in what marriage actually consists of, the psychology of family behavior, and the differences between families. 

With all these classes, I will also be about to graduate as a member of the honor society named “Triota,” or Iota Iota Iota.  Triota is an  honor society that recognizes and promotes excellence within the discipline of Women’s Studies. The “Iota” represents three goddesses: Inana, Ishtar, and Isis.  From the beginning to the end, I have held a 3.6 GPA in my minor.  I am very proud of everything this minor has given me.  They are more than just “feminist classes.”  My professors and courses have taught me about society, the differences that make us all one person, and how I can become a better person throughout my life.  I am thankful that Kutztown offers a minor for students like me who are wanting to learn more about these topics.