Spooky Sisters: Four Female Writers That Made Horror History

Spooky Sisters: Four Female Writers That Made Horror History

By: Jessie Donahue

 

Spooky season is officially upon us, and the progress of female empowerment is always on trend. Here are four female writers that revolutionized the horror and mystery genres:

 

  1. Mary Shelley

 

Best known for her debut novel, Frankenstein, Mary Shelley serves as a gothic literature inspiration and an early example of science fiction. Shelley published her most famous book anonymously and was given positive critical reception. However, once it was revealed to be written by a woman, she faced backlash for the “gentleness” of her work. Nevertheless, Frankenstein remains critically acclaimed and has been adapted several time. Additionally, Shelley is still considered a significant figure for her achievements and voice as a liberal woman.

  1. Shirley Jackson

    Whether it’s through her haunting short stories or classics novels, Shirley Jackson has undoubtedly proven herself as the queen of horror. After garnering recognition for her short story, “The Lottery”, Jackson continued to create chilling stories that are still widely considered to be some of the most prominent in the horror genre. Her book, The Haunting of Hill House remains cited as the most influential ghost story ever told.

 

  1. Agatha Christie

    Agatha Christie easily triumphs in all things mysterious, writing sixty-six detective novels within her career. More than thirty films have been based on her work, with adaptations being made through television, radio, and comics as well. She has been listed by Guinness World Records as the best-selling novelist of all time. Her most notable works include And Then There Were None, Murder on the Orient Express, and the Hercule Poirot series.

 

  1. Daphne du Maurier

    If you’ve seen seen Jamaica Inn, Rebecca, or The Birds, then you’ve already heard of

Daphne du Maurier’s work. Though she did not initially receive high praise in the literary community, du Maurier has made a name for herself and her craft with her moody and paranormal writing. She has also been recognized as Alfred Hitchcock’s favorite writer, with some of her books being adapted into films by the famous director.