DU Diversity Summit Winter 2020

  1. 1. Tuesday, January 21, 2020

    Summit Opening & Keynote Patrisse Cullors; Gates Concert Hall, 01/21/20 9:00am - 10:30am

    "Join us as Chancellor Haefner welcomes participants to the annual DU Diversity Summit. Keynote speaker, Patrisse Cullors, Cofounder of Black Lives Matter and founder of Dignity and Power Now. Cullors is a freedom fighter, performance artist, popular public speaker, and a New York Times bestselling author. She’s received many awards for activism and movement building, including being named by the Los Angeles Times as a Civil Rights Leader for the 21st Century and the Sydney Peace Prize for her work with Black Lives Matter."

    Post Key-Note Debrief with Community + Values; Katherine A. Ruffatto Hall Commons, 01/21/20 4:00pm - 5:30pm

    "Intermediate Session. The Community and Values Initiative understands that in building community, we must provide space for the community to come together to ignite conversation of impact. In this session, we hope to bring the community together to further discus the insightful keynote speaker, Patrisse Cullors. The objective of this session will focus on hearing stories from those in our community and encourage community members to listen deeply enough to be another so that they might walk out of the room having learned something new and consider a different perspective than their own. After the debrief session, participants will receive a Community and Values gift of Patrisse Cullor’s book, When They Call You A Terrorist: A Black Lives Matter Memoir. We hope to continue the conversation to further discuss the book with our community in the months to follow."

  2. 2. Wednesday, January 22, 2020

    (SOLD OUT) Critically Reflecting on Us so We Can Get to We: Whites Organizing for Racial Consciousness; Sturm Hall 491, 01/22/20 9:30am - 11:00am

    "Introductory Session. Critically reflecting on one’s own complicity with institutional racism is imperative in order to move towards a more just world. In this session, participants will learn some characteristics of white supremacy culture, reflect on how white supremacy culture impacts different spaces, and reflect on how participants individually are complicit in contributing to a culture of white supremacy. Participants will also identify further steps they can take to understand white supremacy as well as methods for continuing education and action."

    (SOLD OUT) Getting to “We, the People” – Transforming Conflict in Politics; Daniels College of Business 345, 01/22/20 9:30am - 11:00am

    "As we know, political conflict affects us deeply as a nation, a people, and personally. What can we do about it? In another election year, how do we talk politics without yelling, seething, or silencing each other or ourselves? In conversation, how do we ethically maintain family, school, or work relationships with integrity? Honoring your personal identities or professional role(s), you will learn tools to survive the election year with personal peace and grace through engaging political diversity. Using the experiential Action/Reflection model, this session will accommodate various types of learners, abilities, faiths, political ideologies, and education levels. Content and delivery will be sensitive and responsive to identities and expressions with a trauma-informed social justice approach."

    Post Key-Note Debrief with Community + Values; Katherine A. Ruffatto Hall Commons, 01/22/20 10:00am - 11:00am

    "Intermediate Session. The Community and Values Initiative understands that in building community, we must provide space for the community to come together to ignite conversation of impact. In this session, we hope to bring the community together to further discus the insightful keynote speaker, Patrisse Cullors. The objective of this session will focus on hearing stories from those in our community and encourage community members to listen deeply enough to be another so that they might walk out of the room having learned something new and consider a different perspective than their own. After the debrief session, participants will receive a Community and Values gift of Patrisse Cullor’s book, When They Call You A Terrorist: A Black Lives Matter Memoir. We hope to continue the conversation to further discuss the book with our community in the months to follow."

    (WAITLIST) Connecting Social Identity to Your Career Development; Daniels College of Business 210, 01/22/20 10:00am - 11:30am

    "Intermediate Session. This session will facilitate a career development-focused twist on the identity wheel exercise (e.g. LSA Inclusive Teaching Initiative, n.d.). This activity is designed to help individuals connect equity, diversity, and inclusion (EDI) to their career development. By first reflecting on their own identities, and then discussing the relationship of these identities to career development values and models, including a reflection on how experiences may be similar or different for people of other identities, individuals of any career field or stage can deepen their understanding of EDI and in turn enrich their engagement with coworkers from diverse backgrounds and identities. The discussion questions were adapted from Carlstrom, Kaff, and Low’s (2009) chapter “Diversity and Career Advising,” in which they discussed the ways that “traditional career development theories and activities are based on five cultural values [...] that may differ from the cultural, family, and personal values and life experiences of students” (p. 113). By reflecting on these values and how they may have impacted one’s own career development, participants may gain or enrich a lens through which to view the way that social identity is related to career development for people of similar or different backgrounds. This connects to the conference theme of “How do we get to WE?” by helping individuals to move toward a solid foundation in understanding the impact of social identity on work and career, which can cultivate empathy for others and help with disrupting biases and the myth of meritocracy."

    Introduction to Inclusive Excellence (IE); Katherine A. Ruffatto Hall Commons, 01/22/20 11:30am - 1:00pm

    "This session introduces groups to the IE framework, its relation to University mission and values, and supports affiliates in connecting IE to their role and activities on campus. Come join us for this session and bring your own bag lunch."

    What is Critical Whiteness Studies? Sturm Hall 253, 01/22/20 1:00pm - 2:30pm

    "Advanced Session. The field of Critical Whiteness Studies (CWS) is quickly growing and being used to undergird future research on racial equity. However, with this rise comes several concerns. First, how do we not center whiteness in this field? Second, if CWS itself is not a theory then what theories undergird a decentered whiteness approach to CWS. Participants will learn how to apply CWS in noncentering ways."

    (SOLD OUT) Dismantling Power, Privilege and Popsicle Sticks; Daniels College of Business 305, 01/22/20 2:00pm - 3:30pm

    "Intermediate Session. Systems of oppression exist in higher education in many ways. We hold the power to dismantle those systems. Participants will engage in learning more about power and privilege, as well as how that relates to policies, practices, and programming on campus. We will identify areas within our own roles in which we can create equity, and engage in thoughtful discussions about how to put plans into action. Prior experience in identifying individual power and privilege is highly encouraged."

    (SOLD OUT) How to Engage in Difficult Conversations Using Evidence-Based Practices from Psychology; Sturm Hall 187, 01/22/20 2:30pm - 4:00pm

    "Introductory Session. In the past decade, the political environment in the United States has become increasingly divisive, unsafe, and challenging. Data shows that young people, now more than ever, spend less time with those they disagree with, which may be contributing to a polarized and divisive climate. The aim of this non-partisan workshop is to provide participants tools to effectively carry conversations with those we disagree with using longstanding, evidence-based practices from the field of Psychology. This workshop will provide an overview of the physiological underpinnings of difficult conversations (i.e., the Hypothalamic Pituitary Adrenal Axis), such that participants can understand why themselves and others have the behavioral reactions that they do. Then, we will teach tools such as mindfulness, therapeutic motivational interviewing, and behavioral principles to help participants engage in effective dialogues."

    Revisiting the 2016 Demands: Dr. Lili Rodriguez in Conversation with Student Alumni; SIE International Relations Complex Maglione Hall. 01/22/20 4:00pm - 5:30pm

    "Please join us as we welcome former student leaders, Makia Jones and Tashan Montgomery, back to campus to discuss the impact of their involvement in student activism during their tenure at DU."

  3. 3. Thursday, January 23, 2020

    (SOLD OUT) Creating Inclusive Spaces for Transgender and Nonbinary Individuals; Daniels College of Business 345, 01/23/20 9:30am - 11:00am

    "Introductory Session. Creating inclusive environments can be daunting, but in reality there are many small steps people can make to be more welcoming and inclusive to different people. Currently, transgender and nonbinary individuals are a group of people often left out of spaces due to ignorance and misinformation. This workshop will dive into the basics surrounding misinformation about transgender and nonbinary individuals, explore binary gender roles and stereotypes, and ultimately stress the importance of using the pronouns that transgender and nonbinary individuals use. By looking into these three areas people can move from a space of exclusion to inclusion."

    (SOLD OUT) Responding to Microaggressions Workshop; Sturm Hall 480, 01/23/20 10:00am - 12:00pm

    "What are micro and macro aggressions? How do you respond to them and how can increased awareness improve campus climate? Join us as we explore these concepts and commit to creating a counterculture of micro-affirmations."

    Society Evolves, Our “We” Changes. Diversity and Inclusion Can’t Remain the Same; Sturm Hall 251, 01/23/20 11:00am - 12:30pm

    "Intermediate Session. Can, or should, a collective “we” exist and if so, how? And most importantly, who develops and upholds this narrative? As we enter an election year in a nation state perhaps more “divided” than united, this existential question manifests with life and death consequences. Like never before have our identities reckoned such power and resilience, yet divisiveness and injustice. Together, this question will be examined while simultaneously engaging in dialogue surrounding potential limitations- can equality be achieved by helping all at once? Lastly, what implications must be identified in order to begin contemplating outcomes?"

    Closing Event with Ranky Tanky & Recepction; Gates Concert Hall, 01/23/20 3:00pm - 5:30 pm

    "“Ranky Tanky” translates loosely as “Work It,” or “Get Funky!” In this spirit, this Charleston, South Carolina-based quintet performs timeless music of Gullah culture from the southeastern United States. “Gullah” comes from West African language and means “a people blessed by God.” From heartbreaking spirituals to delicate lullabies to playful, ecstatic shouts, these musical roots are “rank” and fertile ground from which these contemporary artists have grown. Join the band for a lecture and musical demonstration exploring the music of Gullah culture. A reception will follow in the Joy Burns Plaza from 4:00pm to 5:30pm. Light refreshments will be served."

Some events are sold out, so hurry to reserve your spot today!

*all information provided by the DU Diversity Summit 2020