Representation Truly Does Matter

Representation Truly Does Matter

Zaire A. Davis

    

There has been much love, support, and excitement from fans who viewed the anticipated film, Black Panther. First of all, if you have not gone to see the movie yet, what are you doing? The movie was worth every bit of hype that it received. From the talented cast, to the glamourizing visual effects, one can not say that the movie was not impressive. Movies such as this one are essential for the future of the film industry. Not only is it refreshing, but it is exciting to see a movie where the characters resemble yourself. We do not often have intense, action-jammed movies where minorities are featured as the lead characters. However, Black Panther showed that people of color are capable of shutting down the box office while keeping audiences hanging from the edge of their seats. This movie is a turning point. Little black boys can have a familiar-looking, authentic superhero to idolize over rather than the typical, blonde, blue-eyed heroes that we pay twelve dollars to see what seems like every other weekend. Little black girls can fantasize and visualize themselves as they look at the beautiful, natural-haired warriors that actresses Lupita Nyong’, Danai Gurira, and Letitia Wright portray.

Representation matters. This is what brings people together. This is what makes people excited. This is what gives people hope. Hope for a new generation where people of different backgrounds, skin tones, and different shapes can arise and become the new “norm”. The stereotyping of what is deemed acceptable and what is “beautiful” is clearly shown when the same types of people and faces are what is continuously offered on the big screen. I proudly raise my glass to director, Ryan Coogler. I (along with most of the viewers of Black Panther, I am sure) am honored to have been able to have got the opportunity to see a film at twenty-years old that would have received just as much enthusiasm and excitement from me at seven years old.