What Would A Hillary Clinton Presidency Mean for Women?

Despite the indisputable progress American society has made over the last century in equalizing the playing field for men and women, inequality still exists between genders. The presence of women in government is limited, women are a rare sight in the evolving field of technology and engineering and a woman on average still makes only 79 cents per a man’s dollar for the same exact job.

Civic leaders in the movement have come and gone, and their presence has not gone unnoticed, but America now has the opportunity to change the entire game of women’s rights with one fell swoop: electing a woman into the oval office.

While the controversy surrounding Hillary Clinton has been plenty, there is one thing that we all can agree upon; a woman in office would be a monumental step on the long journey towards gender equality.

There are many people, however, who have expressed their belief that a woman is not fit to fill a role of such capacity. Atlanta-born rapper T.I., for example, said in an interview with DJ Whoo Kid that, “…women make rash decisions emotionally,” and “…you might be able to get the Loch Ness Monster elected before [a woman].” Freshman education major Effie Soldatos disagrees, saying, “Gender doesn’t determine how well you can stand your ground.”

Although many people oppose the idea of a female president, many students still hold true that electing a woman into office could pave the way for more equality. Bridget Wagner, a senior human resources major, stated that, if a woman were elected president, “The glass ceiling that is put in by our society will be shattered by proving that women are equally as qualified [as men].”

This belief is not hers alone. Freshman accounting and human resources major Alicia Maynard agrees, stating, “Having a female president would change the way our country addresses the female [role]…change will happen, but it will take time and understanding.”

For many, however, electing a female as president is just the beginning. “Discrimination is still seen in the workplace such as holding [executive] positions and wage gaps,” Wagner said. “The generation that is entering the workforce today will be changing these barriers and proving that women, minorities and people with disabilities have an equal chance.”

At a minimum, electing a female president would serve as a beacon of hope for women of all ages. “This [could have] a huge impact by motivating young women and girls to receive an education, push themselves to be the best that they can be and to end discrimination,” Wagner said. “Having a role model such as the first female president will teach young women [and] even men to advocate for themselves, build leadership skills and fight for what he or she believes in.”

Politics aside, if a female were to be inaugurated into the oval office next January, it would serve as a huge turning point in the women’s rights movement and their search for gender equality.