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Things You Do That Aren’t Safe for the Environment

With Earth Day right around the corner, many are wondering what they can do to help save our planet. Social Media apps like TikTok and Instagram have informed many on how they are contributing to pollution – for example, saving the turtles by using reusable straws. 

 

Although there are good tips out there, I have listed more things that you might do that aren’t safe for the environment. 

 

USING PADS/TAMPONS

Women who have their menstrual cycles and use pads or tampons are contributing to pollution. Pads and tampons come in plastic, which takes a long time to decompose. The pads and tampons are made out of non-recyclable products as well. With many women having their cycles – this creates an issue. 

 

Many companies have come up with alternatives for women to use. For example, there are period cups and period panties which have a significant decrease in pollution because they are reusable. 

 

EATING MEAT

Whenever we think about pollution, we think about cars, clothes, and garbage. What many don’t know is that the meat industry is the leading cause of pollution in the air and uses a great amount of water. Every stage of the process of getting the meat contributes to pollution. From the factory emitting pollutants to the methane, ammonia, and CO2 from manure, this process is very problematic.

 

To help with this issue, eating less to no meat (switching to a plant-based diet) would work. Realistically, not everyone is willing to give up meat, but consuming less would equal less production and would lessen the rate of pollutant emission.

 

USING PAPER TOWELS

Paper towels are useful when you have spills, or need to clean up after yourself. Using paper towels contributes to pollution because there is a lot of paper towel waste in the United States. The use of paper towels also contributes to deforestation, since we need to get this from trees. 

 

Instead of using paper towels, you can use rags/towels that you can wash when you’re finished with it.

 

Throughout the next few days, pay attention to what you use and how you use it/dispose of it. Think about what would be better for the environment before buying or consuming it.

 

Kiana Hodge

Buffalo '23

Kiana Hodge. University at Buffalo class of 2023. Majoring in Legal Studies and in the Journalism Certificate Program.
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