Spice Up Your Final Projects with These Four Websites

I don’t know about you, but for me, PowerPoint and Google Slides get boring, especially after a whole semester of (over)reliance on them. The end of April usually means deadline after deadline, and for many majors, it’s all about project development. If you’re looking for something to disrupt the monotonous workflow for a while, check out these websites.

  1. 1. Typeform

    laptop with plants

    Typeform, which you may have taken a survey on before, offers an amazing blend of design and utility. Basic features are free, but if you’re handing in a project with advanced components, you can always just give your professor the log-in information. I most recently used Typeform to create a choose-your-own-adventure story based on a novel for a history class. It offers an easy-to-use interface, clean images and templates, and advanced sorting/organizing, so that your audience’s answers to the questions will actually impact the outcome. Check it out to make quizzes or just to spice up forms and surveys. 

  2. 2. Miro

    Miro is an interactive whiteboard designed for collaboration. It’s well suited for all stages of the project development process, from brainstorming to presentation. Like Google Slides, everyone can work together at once. The canvas is “infinitely zoomable,” offering you unlimited real estate. Give it a whirl for brainstorming sessions or hand in the whiteboard itself as a multimedia hodgepodge of writing, photos, and more.

  3. 3. Notion

    Notion is one of my all-time favorite tools for personal organization. You can use it as a website too, whether you’re displaying a gallery of photos, spreadsheets and tables, or embedding PDF files and videos. Make one page or make many. Designs are clean, templates are ready to be used, and the ability to click around might be a nice break from scrolling. 

  4. 4. Visme

    person holding coffee and typing on laptop

    Visme calls itself the “whole workshop,” with capabilities ranging from classic presentations to charts, infographics, and more. For the design-focused, Visme offers the same customization as Canva, with more of a focus on data visualization and presentations. Visme may not be ideal for a no-frills one-and-done project, but if you’re really committed to making your product as engaging and visually appealing as possible, give it a shot.

Fingers crossed a new fun website will make those last projects and assignments more bearable! Check these out, or do some research for a lesser-known but far more exciting tool to end the semester. 

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