Yom Kippur

Yom Kippur is probably the most important holiday of the Jewish year. Jewish people not go to work and fast for 25 hours. They attend synagogue.

Yom Kippur means day of atonement, where people ask God for forgiveness for all the bad things they have done throughout the year. Jewish people believe, in the Days of Awe that come before Yom Kippur, God writes everyone's names in a book. On Yom Kippur, God shuts the book and if you haven't asked for forgiveness, God will remember. 

On this day, Jewish people wear white clothes and wear some special garment called a Kittel. The fast begins on the evening before Yom Kippur and ends at sunset on Yom Kippur. If you cannot fast, you must have talked to the Rabbi at the synagogue.

Rules for Yom Kippur:

  1. No washing
  2. No bathing
  3. No using make up or deodorants 
  4. No eating 
  5. No drinking (especially water)

In the synogogue on the day of Yom Kippur, Jewish people will spend the day in services and prayer.