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The Hidden Gem that Is Love, Death + Robots

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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The Netflix show Love, Death + Robots is a hidden treasure with genre-defying episodes. Created by Tim Miller, it’s an anthology with 18 episodes, each one lasting under 20 minutes, and I am on an eternal mission to recommend it to anyone that will hear me out. This animated and live action series premiered on March 15, 2019, and before that, its promotional material was pretty cryptic. It consisted of diverse symbols and small snippets that represented each episode of the show, not really detailing what they, or the series as a whole, would be about. Due to the show’s mysterious advertising strategy, not a lot of people had the chance to find out about it. But now having finished watching the show fully, I know that the promotional team made an excellent decision. 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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Photo via @lovedeathandrobots

There is no specific way to describe Love, Death + Robots. If you ask anyone who has seen the show to describe it, they might struggle a bit, as each viewer should definitely experience it for themselves. Firstly, it is crucial to note that this show is meant for adults. Depending on what episode you decide to watch first, you might question the intended audience, but as you progress, binging through episodes that feature explicit violence and explicit sexual content, you’ll understand. The show’s episodes range from yogurt being sentient to a woman witnessing a murder. If you were curious before, let me clarify now, that the episodes do not even have similar themes and are all placed in extremely unassociated realities. They are all within different genres, with different styles of animation and tones. 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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Photo via @lovedeathandrobots

The show’s uniqueness owes itself to its crew, formed up of diverse types of artists wanting to tell all kinds of stories. The show wanted to present stories from all around the world, to show past and future aspects of humanity, the advancement of technology, social dilemmas, and even that farmers can be excellent sci-fi protagonists. Some episodes aren’t even animated, but they all have this mystical sense of wonder that makes you question what you’re watching every single time. And I do mean every time, because there is no specific order to the episodes; Netflix provides four unique orders to the episodes, each episode order of season 1 being randomly released to every user, as to make their experience as unique as possible. 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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Photo via @lovedeathandrobots

Love, Death + Robots has a diverse bunch of stories that will make you laugh, cry, question humanity, and appreciate cats even more. Even if you watch the first episode and don’t like it, try watching a couple more, because given the range of genres this anthology series manages to cover, I am sure that you will find an episode that you love. I personally cannot recommend any episode over the other because I do not have a favorite one; to me, they are all so unique that they can’t even be compared to each other. Again, there is no definite way to describe Love, Death + Robots, but just know, it is a brilliant masterpiece that is getting a second season, so be sure to watch the first one so you can get a grasp on how this series works. One thing from it is for certain though: everyone who worked on it poured a lot of time and effort into its creation, even the silliest of episodes having a well thought out story. So, go! Go on and watch it, right now. What are you waiting for?

Photo via @lovedeathandrobots

Melanie graduated from the University of Puerto Rico, Río Piedras Campus, from a Bachelor of Arts in Social Sciences with a major in Psychology and a second major in English Literature in the summer of 2021. In her free time she enjoys reading, writing, watching shows, and playing video games.
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