3 Reasons Why Everyone Should Listen to The Nod Podcast

Since July 2017, The Nod podcast has brought unknown aspects of black culture to light with energy and humor. Topics in the podcast range from history to pop culture to conspiracy theories as the hosts of the show, Brittany Luse and Eric Eddings, playfully share their love for blackness with the audience.

Since this show has made a huge impact on my life, I figured that it would be appropriate to pay homage to it by arguing three reasons why everyone should listen to The Nod.

I would first like to begin claiming that the podcast exemplifies extraordinary media. To me, media that is extraordinary is both informing and entertaining.

They must acknowledge their biases while being open to new opinions. Extraordinary media must encourage the audience to participate in the media. The Nod does all of this and so much more. Okay now to the reasons why everyone should listen:

 

Reason one: The show connects with the audience by using narratives that are relatable. 

In a few of the episodes, the theme of togetherness within families is prevalent. Whether the show is focused on a conflict between siblings or a person coping with the loss of a loved one, the stories remind the listeners that they are never alone when they feel like they are going through something.

The vulnerability of those who share their stories on the show reveal their trust in the hosts and listeners. This creates a sense of community within the show.

 

Reason two: The show is dedicated to giving credit to black persons who have contributed to entertainment but are not talked about often in other forms of media.

The show highlights actors, comedians, fashion influencers, and singers who have worked to change the way people see black Americans in the media. The people highlighted do not typically get attention from paparazzi or social media but are well-known for their roles in The Fresh Prince of Bel Air, Roots, All That, and many other places in media.

The audience is reminded of the people who have impacted them in their earlier lives and is updated with what these influencers are currently doing to continue to contribute to black culture.

 

Reason three: The show plays games that not only engage the audience with participation in the show but also subtly encourages audiences to learn more about black culture from the results from the games.

The hosts are very competitive in the show, which brings life to games. The hosts or whoever appears in the show compete to see who knows the most about the culture.

Some of the games test if aspects in pop culture are “Good for the Blacks” while other games are timed with “Peanut Butter History.” Personally, I have used some of the information that I have learned from these games to generate conversation in both social and academic settings.

 

The Nod’s unique take on black culture has the power to engage all listeners—young and old, black and non-black—to connect with each other. The show continues to connect with the listeners on social media.

This expands the community to so many more audiences. Not to mention, the hosts’ sense of humor makes listening to the show feel like they are listening to friends chat in a coffee shop. For these reasons and so many more, everyone should listen to The Nod podcast.