The Life of a Spendaholic

To spend or not to spend... at the end of the day is a shopping problem the same as a spending problem?

 

Daniella:

They say the first step is to come to terms with it, which is something I have done, but what comes after? I have uttered the words: I am a shopaholic. There’s nothing like the feeling you get when you buy something new that you look and feel amazing in or the little trinket that brings back memories and makes you feel all warm inside. I for sure have a spending problem, but now that I have come to terms with it, what can I do about it?

I have heard lots of tips on how to control my spending problem but none of them worked. There are little tricks that I tried out that have sometimes helped me (emphasis on sometimes). For example, I have left all my cards at home, or I have taken out half of my money in cash and hidden it. The cards at home worked for shopping but not when I needed to run errands, or cover basic necessities like food and gas. The cash I found worked for me, because out of sight, out of mind right? I would go weeks, and sometimes even months and completely forget I had cash hidden. The problem would arise when I re-found the cash because I “relapsed.” Another tip that has worked for me in the past is texting or face-timing a friend while I’m at the store and asking them if I need it, making them serve as my moral compass essentially.

The moral of this personal experience is: do what makes you happy and if that’s shopping than go for it, but find your limit and stick to it. Don’t get to the point where it’s between a pair of shoes and a meal (hint: normally the shoes win). I’ve learned that it’s ok to splurge every once in a while, but it’s not necessary to do it every day or week. Keep your health in mind, if its necessary to write reminders or self-motivational notes to keep you from shopping, do it (I definitely have).

 

Ellie:

First and foremost. Raise your wallet if you think you have a shopping problem. If you can’t walk into a store without buying something, you may have a problem.

Being a shopaholic means that you are addicted to shopping or are otherwise a person with compulsive buying disorder. It doesn’t seem like a real problem until you run out of money or start using credit cards to feed your habit.

My specific problem is that I buy A LOT of clothes. Fortunately, I realized that my problem was affecting my wallet about a year ago, so I don’t have as many financial problems as I used to.

 

Lauren:

Anyone who knows me, knows that I have a horrible problem with money management. The main problem I have is that while I do have a steady income coming in, I only get paid monthly. I tend to run out of money around the 15th of every month because I don’t know how to say no to something I just “need to have”. Whether that be a new shirt, food, shoes, makeup, organizational tools or holistic healing items. I also really love the feeling of wearing or playing with something new. My absolute favorite thing is to try on or apply my new items the minute I get home to see how they work/fit. It’s a calming setup and it works for some of my self-care that I’ve implemented into my daily life.

I have gotten better though. I am working toward saving up for a car and I’m attempting to put at least a little bit of my money away each month so it will add up quickly but the problem is that I can’t lock that account. I know there’s money there and the thought of going out and getting even just a tiny tube of lipstick makes me feel excited and then that saved up money trickles down slowly.

Please if anyone has any money saving tips send them my way. I need them!

 

Image Credits: 1 2 3 4 5