Her Campus Logo Her Campus Logo

Happy New Year… Again!

So, you started the new year off on the wrong foot. You forgot to bring that list of 2011 resolutions back to campus with you and instead of working out more and eating healthier, you realize you haven’t set foot in the SRC yet and Coldstone keeps calling your name. Stop right there; you may just have another chance! The Chinese New Year begins this week on February 3. This day is part of The Spring Festival, which is not only the most important, but also the longest festival of the Chinese Lunar Calendar.

The holiday is celebrated in more places than just mainland China including Singapore, Malaysia, Hong Kong, Taiwan and Vietnam. I’m currently spending my spring semester abroad in Hong Kong and I feel like the holiday has already taken over the city. Whether you’re taking pictures at one of the Chinese New Year mall displays, purchasing little red envelopes to hand money gifts out to loved ones or visiting the flower markets with friends and family, you’ll find splashes of lavish color everywhere. It’s time to say goodbye to the Year of the Tiger and bring in the Year of the Rabbit.

Both of the tiger and rabbit are part of the Chinese Zodiac. The Zodiac is based on a 12-year cycle; each year represents a different animal with associated personality traits and characteristics. Dr. Maoshing Ni, featured on Yahoo! Health, forecasts that this year will be less forceful and stressful than the last because the rabbit exhibits a softer energy than that of the tiger. However, The Washington Post argues that the year will be “anything but cuddly,” with various world conflicts potentially arising throughout the year. What does the Year of the Rabbit have in store for you? If you’re like me and biting your nails over the whole summer internship search while reading this article, it might be a good idea to take the Chinese holiday to recollect your thoughts and regain your energy before the spring semester kicks into full gear.

Although Chinese New Year is mostly a family holiday, I do plan to visit the flower market on Chinese New Year’s Eve with friends as well as explore any events or celebrations going on around the city on Chinese New Year’s Day. Who knows, maybe I’ll even buy myself a rabbit figurine for good luck and fortune this year. Check it out; even Michael Jordan’s celebrating the New Year! Both Air Jordan and Nike Air Force One are releasing exclusive Year of the Rabbit shoes for the holiday.

Bring a little of the Chinese New Year mentality to the Hill. Check out your own Chinese zodiac horoscope for the upcoming Year of the Rabbit in areas like career, relationships, health and wealth at Astrology.com: what’s your sign?

1.       Rat 2008, 1996, 1984, 1972, 1960, 1948, 1936, 1924, 1912, 1900

2.       Ox 2009, 1997, 1985, 1973, 1961, 1949, 1937, 1925, 1913, 1900

3.       Tiger -2010, 1998, 1986, 1974, 1962, 1950, 1938, 1926, 1914, 1902

4.       Rabbit -2011, 1999, 1987, 1975, 1963, 1951, 1939, 1927, 1915, 1903

5.       Dragon -2012, 2000, 1988, 1976, 1964, 1952, 1940, 1928, 1916, 1904

6.       Snake -2013, 2001, 1989, 1977, 1965, 1953, 1941, 1929, 1917, 1905

7.       Horse -2014, 2002, 1990, 1978, 1966, 1954, 1942, 1930, 1918, 1906

8.       Goat -2015, 2003, 1991, 1979, 1967, 1955, 1943, 1931, 1919, 1907

9.       Monkey -2016, 2004, 1992, 1980, 1968, 1956, 1944, 1932, 1920, 1908

10.     Rooster -2017, 2005, 1993, 1981, 1969, 1957, 1945, 1933, 1921, 1909

11.     Dog -2018, 2006, 1994, 1982, 1970, 1958, 1946, 1934, 1922, 1910

12.     Pig –2019, 2007, 1995, 1983, 1971, 1959, 1947, 1935, 1923, 1911

Sources:

Mong Kok East Mall (photo): Nancy Torres

Similar Reads👯‍♀️