African-American, Hermione Granger in the Cursed Child

 

Canon; Brown eyes, frizzy hair and very clever. White skin was never specified. Rowling loves black Hermione! Like, especially how Rowling does really feel about black Hermione? Is that why she called her a mud-blood? I need to know! There has been such a controversy on such topic since the casting of Hermione Granger in the play in England called “Harry Potter and the Cursed Child”. Since then some people were and still are very mad about the casting of a "black" Hermione Granger. The author herself, J.K. Rowling has decried critics of the casting of a black actress as Hermione as “a bunch of racists”. To bad there isn’t a magical spell to silence the haters.

Let’s go to what J.K. Rowling wrote in her books; Hermione’s white face was sticking out from behind a tree while blushing red. White can be used to describe facial expressions. In addition, the author herself described the effects of a sunny summer in Ron and Hermione’s skin to which we can suppose Hermione is tanned as said in one of her books. Her fans are confused and furious.

Looks like people are not caring about her personal qualities as a being, but rather her skin color and her race; either white, black, or maybe even something else. Some can say J.K. Rowling is not being clear about her own books.

Personally, I love how Hermione being black is somehow more implausible to some people than a universe where the entire postal system depends on owls. Where it all goes down to it, it is the creator not everyone else’s viewpoint because the series itself was written by J.K. Rowling not anybody else. It simply does not matter. 

Going to other characters of color, I thought the only characters of color in the books at that point were Lee Jordan, Dean Thomas, Padma and Pavarti Patil, and Cho Chang. I knew that these characters and future characters, like Kingsley Shacklebolt and Blaise Zambini were people of color because they were described as such. While some of these characters had a decent side of the stories in the book series, it was easy to forget about them because of the focus on the main characters and the fact that they were mainly put on the side. So, their stories weren’t in the films mainly like the others. 

Another reason that the film adaptions of the books failed its characters of color is that they risked confusing its viewers with casting changes. In the first three films, the character Angelina Johnson was played by a light – skinned actress named Danielle Tabor. However, in the fourth film (Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire), Angelina was played by a darker – skinned actress named Tiana Benjamin before the character disappeared altogether. Lavender Brown, as mostly seen by a light – skinned actress named Jessie Cave in (Harry Potter and the Half – Blood Prince, and Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows Part 2) was a replacement for a dark – skinned actress named Jennifer Smith as seen in the earlier films.

Some critics of Marron’s take on the films have used census data to say that there weren’t a lot of black people in the U.K. when the books were written. Since the book series has been read by millions around the world, this fact does not apply. It is strange to think that wizards and magical creatures can exist in a fantasy world, but complex people of color or other marginalized voices can’t. While every single world was meant to critique the Harry Potter films, it showed that both the books and the films are at fault.

When I was in growing up, Hermione Granger was one of the literary characters I turned to for comfort. Like her, I was made fun of for being nerdy but she made me feel like someday I could be more than just a misfit. But even though that is where my comfort is of Hermione of the caucasian race, I can also be conditioned to Hermione of color which I have been for like a while now. I will always love the Harry Potter series and I am grateful to J.K. Rowling for introducing me to fantasy fiction and making my childhood and teen years magical, No matter what racial non-sense is going on!