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What Pink Means to Me

October 1 brings many thoughts: pumpkins, corn mazes, apple cider, small children running around in costumes asking for candy, and that’s just to name a few. Don’t get me wrong, I love everything pumpkin flavored and running around in a field of corn, but October means much more to me than that.

A couple years ago, my great aunt Ann was diagnosed with breast cancer. No one ever expects to hear that they have cancer, but we never really thought Ann would.

She is the kind of person everyone goes to, like the mom of our family. She calls the shots and gets things done, but always has a helping hand and a listening ear. She was also a registered nurse and worked in the ER and with EMS for Iredell County.

Thankfully, after chemo and a mastectomy, Ann is still with us today. She’s always supported my mom and me, which I am so gracious for since my maternal grandmother is not here. Because of her drive and kind heart, she is the reason I want to become a nurse to help others who can’t help themselves for the time being.

Ann obviously isn’t the only person in the world to have breast cancer. One in eight women will develop breast cancer in their lives. Isn’t that a scary statistic?

Throughout October, many events are going on to honor those who have lost their battle, recognize those who have won, educate those who don’t know the signs and symptoms, and bring awareness to the disease that takes the lives of so many each year.

Breast cancer is diagnosed when breast cells begin to grow out of control. These cells form tumors that can be malignant (cancerous) or benign (noncancerous). These tumors can be removed by just removing the tumor or removing the breast as a whole (mastectomy). You can learn more about breast cancer and the warning signs from the following websites:

http://www.cancer.org/healthy/morewaysacshelpsyoustaywell/breastcancer

https://www.brightpink.org

Pink means more than just a color to me. It’s someone’s courage to keep fighting when chemotherapy is breaking them down. It’s the love and support from a community. It’s a daily reminder that my great Aunt is now stronger than she was before, because *cue Reba McEntire* she’s a survivor.

Love you always Ann.

 
 
Sophomore Psychology Major at Appalachian State University. Member of Zeta Tau Alpha, Student Teacher Assistant and Lover of all things Jesus, Sugar Skulls, and FRIENDS.  
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