5 of the Coolest Start-Ups Created by College Women

Many college students dream of finishing college and starting their very own businesses. But for some, their business dreams don’t have to wait until after college. These five young women started their own businesses while continuing their college studies. They’ve done everything from philanthropic ventures to one-of-a-kind clothing lines. Check out their amazing start-ups:

Katelyn Ringrose, ImpowerUS

University of Notre Dame, 2018

After aiding refugee and immigrant children through the immigration and naturalization process, Katelyn launched ImpowerUS, a platform dedicated to connecting immigrant youth, ages eight to twenty-two, with the resources they need to navigate the immigration process. On their website, you can use an anonymous forum to ask questions or schedule a virtual meeting with an immigration attorney. Did you know that 77% of unrepresented youth receive a removal order, as opposed to 10% of those that seek the advice of an attorney? The service is quick and free, truly making this start-up easy for everyone to use. 

Regina Ye, ZIRUI

Mount Holyoke College, 2018

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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Have you ever had a bottle of conditioner, soap or anything else spill in your suitcase while traveling? Yeah, I know the feeling — and Regina Ye does too. In 2017, she created ZIRUI, a compact, secure and sleek storage solution to travel with your essential liquids. It saves you space and time so you can travel with your favorite products on the go. The case sticks together magnetically (genius) and is also TSA-friendly!

Petroula Lambrou, Patty Pops

Fordham University 2014

Petroula Lambrou is a business student with a creative flair. Where is her creativity best found? In her desserts. Petroula began baking and selling various cupcakes and cake pops in 2010, then took what she had learned in business class and put it to the test. Patty Pops offers various baked goods with an array of flavors like vanilla coconut, raspberry cream cheese, and whipped banana. With the help of her friends and family, she did a city-wide campaign to advertise her new business. Now, Petroula says she makes around 250 per week, sometimes more. “This number can go up to about 500 depending on if I am doing a large wedding or if it is a holiday weekend,” she says. She even sponsored a “Make Me a Cake-Pop” competition on Patty Pop’s Facebook page, inspiring her customers to get creative.

Laura Carpenter, Abridge News

Harvard University, 2018

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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It's really hard to keep up with all the news, let alone make time for it. That's why Laura Carpenter made Abridge News, which provides balanced summaries of a bunch of news stories, from North Korea to Harvey Weinstein. For op-eds, Abridge curates four interesting op-ed pieces and sorts them based on the content — readers can then read opinion pieces from the far left, far-right and everything in-between. 

Alex White, Taya Christianson, Greta Zorn, Uterish

Pomona College, Boston University, Barnard College, 2020

This startup began as a high school project but evolved into so much more once Alex, Taya and Greta went to college. As a response to the physical and legislative attacks on Planned Parenthood and bodies with uteruses, Uterish was made. Uterish operates as an online platform to connect activists, sell feminist apparel, publish an informative monthly newsletter, produce and curate opinionated blog posts, and support Planned Parenthood and the right to bodily autonomy. All profits benefit Planned Parenthood. Buy apparel here