HC Wake-Up Call: Steve Bannon Apologizes for Delayed Response to 'Fire and Fury' Comments, BBC Editor Quits After Accusing Company of 'Breaking Equality Law' & Dunkin Donuts Cuts Certain Menu Items

Good morning Her Campus! With a break-neck news cycle, there is no possible way for you to stay on top of every story that comes across your feeds—we’re all only human, after all.

But, life comes at you fast. So grab a cup of coffee and settle in for this quick and dirty guide to stories you might’ve been sleeping on (like, literally. It’s early.)

Steve Bannon Has Apologized for Not Responding Sooner to His Negative Comments in 'Fire and Fury'

ICYMI, the past week hasn't been the best for former White House chief strategist Steve Bannon. After his comments criticizing the Trump administration and Donald Trump Jr. in the new book Fire and Fury: Inside the Trump White House went public, President Donald Trump insisted that Bannon had "lost his mind." His contributions to the book led to Trump hinting at taking legal action against him. Now, CNN reports that Bannon regrets not responding to the publication of his comments sooner.

"Donald Trump Jr. is both a patriot and a good man," Bannon said in a statement. "He has been relentless in his advocacy for his father and the agenda that has helped turn our country around. I regret my delay in responding to the inaccurate reporting regarding Don Jr. has diverted attention from the president's historical accomplishments in the first year of [Trump's] presidency."

Bannon also clarified that his comments regarding Trump Jr.'s Trump Tower meeting with a Russian lawyer were directed toward Paul Manafort. "He should have known they are duplicitous, cunning and not our friends," he said of Manafort.

Top BBC Editor Quits After Claiming Company Is 'Breaking Equality Law'

BuzzFeed News reports that a top BBC journalist has resigned after accusing the company of encouraging a "secretive and illegal pay culture" and "breaking equality law" in relation to female staffers' payment.

BBC China editor Carrie Gracie wrote a letter to BBC viewers revealing this belief, saying, "The BBC belongs to you, the license fee payer. I believe you have a right to know that it is breaking equality law and resisting pressure for a fair and transparent pay structure."

Following other renowned female BBC journalists calling out their employer for its notable gender pay gap last year, Gracie's letter stated that she had been paid 33 percent less than male international editors. Gracie claimed that "up to 200 women" have complained about unequal pay in the last six months. In her letter, she said, "Despite the BBC's public insistence that my appointment demonstrated its commitment to gender equality, and despite my own insistence that equality was a condition of taking up the post, my managers had yet again judged that women's work was worth much less than men's."

Gracie has worked at the BBC for 30 years.

Dunkin Donuts Is Scaling Back Its Menu​

Dunkin Donuts is my go-to place if I'm looking for a simple cup of coffee, but if you're looking for one of its more obscure menu items, you may be out of luck. NBC New York reports that the chain will first debut a simplified menu throughout New England this week before launching it nationwide. Cut from the store are less popular items such as smoothies and some of the breakfast sandwiches. In addition to the cuts, Dunkin Donuts announced that it has also removed artificial dyes from all of its doughnuts. 

Check out the full list of eliminated menu items here

What to look out for...

Jan. 8 is National Bubble Bath Day, because after this week of likely failing to meet your New Year's resolutions, you'll need some self care.