An Open Letter to the 2018 Grammy Awards

Dear 60th Grammy Awards, 

It's no secret that for the 2018 Grammy Awards, no white males artists have been nominated for album of the year. 

This is an incredible milestone in our journey as a country - and our world - towards becoming more accepting and inclusive of people of color, and properly recognizing their work as artists, just like everyone else. They deserve that right to have their work praised.

All I'm saying is please, don't screw it up.

By this, I mean that it is time for the higher-ups (the Academy who chooses the nominees), to recognize that there is more than just one race or face to music. Take what you are doing this year by nominating men and women of color, white women, etc. and run with it. I am tired of seeing people robbed of their recognition year after year, because of the subtle but oftentimes not-so-subtle prejudices and racism in our world today that clouds our judgment. The fact that something so astounding as people of color dominating the most popular category of the Grammy's shouldn't be a surprise. That example there shows me, as well as many other citizens in marginalized communities, that change is well overdue.

I sincerely hope that this is not a stunt to boost ratings for the Grammy's or to create hype. These people deserve everything that is given to them and more. So please, please 60th Grammy Awards, do not underestimate the power of representation. This moment that is scheduled to happen on Jan. 28, could inspire little boys and girls from marginalized communities of color to follow their dreams, and give them the visual representation and hope that they need to do so.

Never underestimate this. Please, stay on this track of keeping the Grammy's diverse, and do NOT screw it up. Give the nominees the love and recognition that they deserve, now and always.

Sincerely,

Someone who wants to see change

 

Photo credits: cover, 1

Brezaja is a sophomore studying film in the School of the Arts at Virginia Commonwealth University. When not writing articles for Her Campus at VCU, you can usually find them endlessly browsing Netflix or checking social media, mostly Instagram and Twitter. They try to be as open-minded as possible, and don't mind having conversations with others about social issues. After college, they dream of being an art director for films.

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