Kendall Scudder '12

 
       
   When it comes to politics, SHSU senior Kendall Scudder is extremely passionate. In fact, a lot of this passion comes from the influences ofsomeone who is close and dear to all of our hearts: General Sam Houston himself! 

            “[He’s] actually the reason that I decided to come to Sam Houston; I wanted his name on my diploma.... He understood the empathy and respect that we as individuals should always have towards God’s creation, but knew that we had to approach it in a logical, cost-efficient manner that protected the individual freedoms of every human being,” Scudder explained. He continued, “I think the world could use another Sam Houston right about now.”

            Scudder is extremely involved in politics on campus. He has served as the Chief of Staff of the SHSU Student Government Association for the past three years. In this position, he has sat on the SHSU Dining Services Committee, the SHSU Parking Appeals Committee, the Student Organization Board, and was the SHSU Homecoming Commissioner of 2010. He was also president of the Bearkat Democrats of SHSU. However, Scudder’s political involvement doesn’t stop at Sam Houston State; He is also politically involved locally, in Huntsville and Walker County, as well as in state-wide organizations.

            “I am currently the National Committeeman of Texas Young Democrats, the Chairman of the Texas Young Democrats Rural Caucus, and I sit on the executive committee for the Texas Blue Dog Coalition,” Scudder says. “I am also the secretary of the Walker County Democratic Party and I serve on the City of Huntsville Youth Advisory Board,” he continues.

            Lately, Scudder has shifted his focus from national and state-wide government to local government.  He plans on staying in Huntsville for some time after graduating and believes that the city could develop in many aspects. These include bettering the public education, improving sewer systems and sidewalks, and embracing the historic history Huntsville has to offer.

            “[We need] to make Huntsville a more efficient and aesthetically pleasing place to live, to learn and to raise our families,” Scudder says.

            When it comes to his future, Scudder isn’t completely sure where he will be, although he does have one plan in mind: “Where I go from here, we’ll let God point me in the right direction. I just want to make sure that whatever I’m doing, I’m making a positive impact on the lives of folks who need a government that will fight for them.”