Workplace Automation: What is at Stake?

The automation of jobs is increasingly present in the contemporary workplace. In different work environments, the work is being done by modern computers and machines, and humans perform routine and repetitive tasks, which absorb a lot of time and further stray them away from the essence of their common physical, mental, and spiritual individual being. This leads them to a lack of self-actualization and fulfillment. Moreover, all the time spent on routine work hinders the worker from sharing more time with his or her family, devoting himself to some kind of hobby, or maybe even practicing a religion. 

Many American workers spend their time performing routine and repetitive work activities. Because work is becoming increasingly automated, they have to perform similar activities over and over again. Furthermore, workers oftentimes suffer various emotional manifestations. Among them, depression, social maladjustment, demotivation. All these emotional alterations are products of working under a lot of pressure and routine labor. 

In the modern world, the employer seeks to gain more capital and profit. To achieve this, he needs an essential tool: the labor power of a worker. The worker sells his work and the employer buys the power of that work for a given period of time. The equation seems simple, but it is not. Because in the production process to obtain more results, the health and integrity of each worker is affected. 

Can one find a balance in the work environment? That is, create a work environment in which the worker does not depart from his emotional, physical and mental integrity, without neglecting the final production that satisfies the employer. To achieve this, employers and employees must collaborate. How? The employer must provide a better work environment, in which the employee feels motivated and satisfied to carry out his activity, and thus, achieve greater production efficiency. Since workers may experience depression, loneliness, demotivation, and are limited in their social life, employers should add extra-labor activities within the work schedule, such as entertainment, conversations with psychological professionals, and even physical activities, which all contribute to employees’ leisure, and allows them to avoid ‘burning out’, become more lively and focused, and less tired. I believe these measures are worth it.