My Parents Don’t Want Me to Rush a Sorority

Are you a smart and savvy pre-collegiette looking for answers to some of your most personal questions about college? You know, the ones about boys, classes, roommates and parties that your school’s guidance office can’t help you with? Jen is here to answer those questions! Whatever your concern, she’ll do her best to help you so you can make sure you don’t just survive college, but rock it!

How do I tell my parents I want to rush a sorority? They think Greek life is all about partying. – Rita

Rita,

Greek life can definitely be an exciting part of the college experience. I know many girls who are in sororities, and many who are not, and there are definitely a lot of pros and cons to both decisions.

Regardless, I understand the desire to want to be in a sorority. Heck, I had wanted to join a sorority ever since I watched Legally Blonde back in 2001, even though I was super young at the time. The sorority house just looked so adorable and fun to be part of – hello to girls’ nights all the time! Ironically, I ended up attending a college where Greek life doesn’t exist. Even though sometimes I wish I could sport the letters I see other girls rocking on monogrammed mugs and spirit jerseys, I’m fine knowing that I’ve still met lots of awesome girlfriends in college that I get to chill with.

Since your parents don’t seem too keen about your idea to rush a sorority, I’d make it a point to have a civil and mature conversation with them. Listen to what they have to say and hear out their concerns, and then tell them exactly why you’d like to join a sorority and give your reasons. You should cater the information that you give them to their specific concerns. So if they think Greek life is all about partying, you can counteract that by showing them how much a sorority at a certain school raised funds for charity last year.

Before you talk with your parents, I’d suggest researching information about different sororities at your campus. Each one has its own rules, traditions and events, so this can help you decide which one you’d like to join when the time comes. If you have a particular sorority in mind, rather than just the idea that you want to join any sorority, it will show them that you did your research, and it gives them the chance to look up the specific sorority on their own if they have more questions. Try your best to get in touch with current or former sisters of the sorority you’re considering and see what they say about their experience.

If you can, try to research two or three sororities rather than just one. Since getting into a sorority isn’t a total guarantee, it’s good to have a few backup options. On the other hand, if you really are only into one sorority, let your parents know that you only plan on pledging if the sorority you think is a perfect fit for you accepts you.

After you’ve chosen a sorority you think you’d like to rush, you should look into what volunteer activities or philanthropy the sisters participate in. This is a great point to make to your parents when you discuss your decision with them. This will remind them that you’ll be able to help out in the community with your sisters, not just party all day and night. There are even sororities such as Kappa Alpha Theta that are primarily community-service based, so they do a lot more volunteering and serving than other sororities. Definitely look into these!

The next step would be to remind yourself that there might be a few things you might not know about a specific sorority until you join. Try and do your best to research and figure out exactly what you’ll be getting yourself into, if possible. It’s better to be aware of everything that comes with joining a sorority—such as the time commitment and fees—before you sign up to prevent wasting your time and money on something that’s not right for you.

Good luck with your decision, and know that whatever happens, you will still meet so many great people in college with or without joining a sorority!

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