An Ohio Bahama Breeze Manager Called The Cops On A Black Sorority — Now, He No Longer Works There

It seems that it's almost impossible to go even a few days anymore without reading a news story about a person or group that was racially profiled unjustly. One of the latest incidents took place in Ohio. 

A group of African American sorority girls were at their local Bahama Breeze, when a manager called the cops on them, claiming that they were rowdy and unwilling to pay their bill.

USA Today reported that the group of nearly 40 claimed the service was slow, but that the situation only escalated once the police were called. The manager who made the call has since been fired. 

One member of the group, Chante Spencer, believes they were racially profiled. She said that at least four of them were asked by police to produce a receipt just in order to leave the restaurant. 

"No one deserves to be treated that way. Nobody," Spencer told WKYC-TV.

Ohio Congresswoman Marcia L. Fudge also spoke out about the incident. 

"It is a chilling reminder that no African American is exempt from the impact of racial profiling when a group of professional women, known for their service and advocacy are victims," Fudge said in a statement on her website. "As an African American woman and a member of Delta Sigma Theta, I am appalled that this occurred in the district I represent, and will not be silent."

This is, unfortunately, not the first time the company has been in hot water for racial harassment. Back in 2009, the company paid out $1.26 million in a settlement for 37 employees that were the victims of racial slurs and denied breaks by management at one location. 

In response to the outcry on Twitter, Bahama Breeze said it has since apologized to the girls. "We clearly fell short of delivering great service to our guests," the company wrote.